Review of the Nunavut Community Justice Program: Final Report

APPENDIX 1 - KEY INUIT QAUJIMAJATUQANGIT CONCEPTS (TERMS OF REFERENCE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE WORKING GROUP, NUNAVUT DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, INUIT QAUJIMAJATUQANGIT WORKING GROUP)

Key IQ Concepts

Pijitsirniq:
The concept of serving and providing for family and/or community.
  • This principle applies to every division of the Department of Justice.
  • All Department of Justice staff will endeavour to serve each other in the workplace.
Aajiiqatigiinniq:
The Inuit way of decision-making.
  • This principle applies to everyone at all times.
  • Decisions should be made through meetings and direct communication.
  • Important communications and decisions will not be made by e-mail.
  • Inuktitut will be anyone's choice of language at any time.
Pilimmatsaniq:
The passing on of knowledge and skills through observation, doing and practice.
  • The workplace will be accommodating and flexible.
  • Accommodating or making room for new (things) practices that needs to be implemented.
  • Inuit staff must be given opportunities to develop skills on the job during regular hours through mechanisms such as cultural training and programs.
Piliriqatigiinniq:
Working together for a common cause.
  • Through collaboration and mutual understanding in the workplace.
  • Inuit and non-Inuit staff will work together from the basis of their own knowledge and experience to develop mutual understanding and a balanced approach to the provision of programs and services.
Avatittinnik Kamattiarnik:
The concept of environmental stewardship.
  • We must apply this principle because of its value to our personal and cultural survival.
  • This principle helps us to ground ourselves in the strengths of our ancestors.
  • It reflects the unique aspects of our culture: e.g. the Inuit ability to survive in the extreme Artic environment.
  • Respecting Inuit practice and relationships with wildlife and the natural environment. Need to collect this information and knowledge and to develop an information source.
Qanuqtuurniq:
The concept of being resourceful to solve problems.
  • It is important to recognize that we must constantly explore many different opportunities in order to find the best ways to move forward.
  • This is the basis of persistence.
Tunnganarniq:
Fostering good spirit by being open, accepting and inclusive.
  • We must follow this at all times, in our words, our actions, in the example we give, in what we do, and in how the workplace is organized.
  • We must make the workplace people friendly, welcoming and open.
Ippigusuttiarniq:
Caring for others and taking their situations and who they are into account.
Angiqatigiinniq:
The tool for proceeding forward with clear understanding.
Ikajuqatigiinniq:
Assistance and cooperation when it is called for, in any shape or form, without barriers.
Qaujimautittiarniq:
Sharing of information through various initiatives and methods.
Uppiriqattautiniq:
It is the foundation for fair treatment, honest commitment to work together, and the source of harmonious environment.
Tukisiumaqatigiinniq:
Like its meaning, conscious understanding of others is the basis of mutual relationships.
Ilainnasiunnginniq:
This principle reminds us to be sensitive to all people because we are uniquely different from one another.
  • Our grandparents and parents have taught us that there are individuals who are dominant and others who are dominated, but that we should treat them equally.
Ilajjuttigiinniq:
To encourage others is important for their goodwill.
  • I encourage you to do well in whatever you are doing.
  • I hope you will be successful in your hunt.
  • The teaching is -putting down an individual has a consequence to the greater whole. As the example is used with dogs in a traditional sense. One dog that is not encouraged and supported equally detaches from the rest of the team and therefore does not perform the expectations.
Aaqqiumatitsiniq:
To keep order in place.
  • As for the workplace, the supervisor or manager should be attentive to the wishes and concerns of the employees.
Iqqaqtuijjiqattariaqannginniq:
We are not to judge other people.
  • Our ancestors taught us never to be judgmental towards someone's past that we were never part of. If a new couple were partnered, the husband was totally discouraged from judging his wife's past. If the wife happened to express her past activities to her new partner, which he doesn't approve of, he is not to keep bringing it up.
Piviqaqtittiniq:
It is important to give people their opportunity for participation and contribution.
  • The opportunity must be there for staff and members to attend meetings and sessions on relating to cultural and language issues.
Silatuniq:
Inuit wisdom is -the wisdom to know how to apply your knowledge.
  • If you asked an Inuit Elder on any question, he/she will give you an answer without checking into secondary information. Silatunikumut isumaginngiqqaujaraluani uqausirijunnattautigijanga.
Ajuqsatittinginniq piviqarialinnik:
To support a place for growth, development and success.

APPENDIX 2 - DOCUMENTS REVIEWED FOR THIS REPORT

  • Government of Nunavut, Department of Justice, Capacity Building for Nunavut's Justice of the peace Program and Community Justice Committees to support the Youth Criminal Justice Act, 2003.
  • Government of Nunavut, Department of Justice, Nunavut Community Justice Agreement Form, 2003.
  • Government of Nunavut, Department of Justice, Draft Diversion Protocol and Agreement, 2003.
  • Government of Nunavut, Department of Justice, Job Description-Community Justice Specialist/Victims Assistance Coordinator (Iqaluit), (no date).
  • Government of Canada and Government of Nunavut, Community Mobilization Partnership, 2003.
  • Government of Canada and Government of Nunavut, Memorandum of Understanding on Canada-Nunavut Cooperation Under the Aboriginal Justice Strategy and the National Crime Prevention Strategy, 2002.
  • Government of Canada (Aboriginal Justice Strategy) and Government of Nunavut, Contribution Agreement, Fiscal Year 2003-04.
  • Government of Canada, Department of Justice, The Federal Prosecution Service Deskbook, Part IV, Chapter 14 and Part VI, Chapter 28.
  • Jamieson, Beals, Lalonde and Associates, Nunavut Projects Funding: An Assessment of the Impact of Projects Funded in Nunavut by the Department of Justice Canada, 2001.
  • Nunavut Department of Justice, Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit Working Group, Terms of Reference of the Department of Justice Working Group, (no date).
  • Victims Assistance Committee of Nunavut, Second Annual Report, March, 2003.
  • Regional Community Justice Specialists, Nunavut Department of Justice, Quaterly Reports on the Activities of the Community Justice Committees, 2002-2004.
  • Stubbs, Valerie, draft document entitled Justice Committee Appoints, Coordinator Job Description, 2003.

APPENDIX 3 - KEY COMMUNITY MEMBERS CONSULTED AND COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM CONSULTATIONS

Community Consultees Interviewed

  • Klara Aglukark
    Coordinator, Arviat Community Justice Committee
  • Kristina Alariaq
    Community Justice Specialist, South Baffin
    Cape Dorset
  • Lena Angnako
    Coordinator, Kanguit Justice Committee (Pangnirtung)
  • Cecelia Ayaruak
    Coordinator, Rankin Inlet Community Justice Committee
  • Judge Beverly Browne
    Chief Judge
    Nunavut Court of Justice
  • Andrew Carter
    Youth Justice Implementation Coordinator
    Nunavut Justice
  • Tim Cavanaugh
    Defence Counsel, Keewatin Legal Aid Centre Society
  • Judy Chan
    Crown Prosecutor
    Justice Canada
  • Cst. Chris Coles
    RCMP Community Justice Liaison, Iqaluit
  • Koovian Flanagan
    Assistant Director, Community Justice
    Nunavut Justice
  • Rachel Furey
    Acting Coordinator
    Iqaluit Restorative Justice Society
    and
    Crown Prosecutor
    Justice Canada
  • Myna Ishulutak
    Community Justice Specialist, Iqaluit
    and
    Victim Assistance Coordinator
    Nunavut Justice
  • Todd Johnson
    Finance Officer
    Hamlet of Arviat
  • Bessie Joy
    Community Justice Specialist, Kitikmeot
    Cambridge Bay
  • Adamie Komoartok
    Deputy Mayor and Court worker
    Pangnirtung
  • Mary Krimmerdjuar
    Community Justice Specialist, North Baffin
    Pond Inlet
  • Guenther Laube
    Director, Northern Region
    National Crime Prevention Centre
    Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
    Yellowknife
  • Ron McCormick
    Director, Corrections and Community Justice
    Nunavut Justice
  • Brad McIsaac
    Director, Maliganik Tukisiniakvik
    (Baffin Region legal aid society)
  • Richard Meredith
    Regional Director
    Justice Canada Nunavut Regional Office
  • Cst. Dominic Milotte
    RCMP, Rankin Inlet
  • Sgt. Bill Mooney
    RCMP, Arviat
  • Dave Pike
    Justice of the Peace
    Arviat
  • Cpl. Law Power
    RCMP Detachment Commander
    Pangnirtung
  • Mireille Provost
    Program Manager
    Innovations, Analysis and Integration Directorate
    Programs Branch
    Justice Canada
  • Nora Sanders
    Deputy Minister
    Nunavut Justice
  • Neil Sharkey
    Justice of the Peace Coordinator
    Nunavut Court of Justice
  • Doug Strader
    Manager, Community Corrections
    Nunavut Justice
  • Valerie Stubbs
    Regional Community Justice Specialist, Kivalliq
    Rankin Inlet
  • Cpl. Wills Thomas
    RCMP Community Justice Liaison, Nunavut
  • Mark Thompson
    Regional Program Manager
    National Crime Prevention Centre
    Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
    Iqaluit
  • Lyn Toner
    Comptroller and Acting Senior Administrative Officer
    Hamlet of Rankin Inlet
  • Rick Van Horn
    Senior Administrative Officer
    Hamlet of Arviat
  • Steve White
    Crown Prosecutor
    Justice Canada

Committee and Program Consultations

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