A One-Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custody Across Canada

Chapter 7 - Saskatchewan (continued)

7.5 Most Serious Charge

Figure 7.5 and Table 7.2 describes the most serious charge/alleged offence (MSC) committed by Aboriginal youth serving remand on Snapshot day. In comparison to the MSO analysis, youth on remand were more likely to be associated with a crime against the person. In Saskatchewan , the largest proportion of Aboriginal youth serving remand was charged with a crime against the person (45%), followed by property offences (35%) and other Criminal Code offences (16%). [1]

Figure 7.5 Most Serious Charge - Remand

Figure 7.5 - Most Serious Charge - Remand
[Description]

Source: One-Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custody (2001).
Prepared by: Research and Statistics Division, Department of Justice Canada .

Of those charged with an offence against the person, 28% were charged for assault with a weapon/causing bodily harm, while 20% were charged for assault. Of those charged for a property-related offence, one-half (55%) were charged with break and enter (see table 7.3).

In Saskatchewan , a larger proportion of female than male Aboriginal youth was charged with an offence against the person (71% versus 33%) (see table 7.2). Similar to the analysis of MSO, males were more likely than females to be charged with a serious offence. For instance, of the males charged with an offence against the person, 31% were charged for sexual assault, while 23% were charged for assault. In comparison, of the females charged with an offence against the person, 33% (each) were charged for assault and assault with a weapon/causing bodily harm (see table 7.3). However, due to small numbers, these results must be interpreted with caution.

Table 7.4 reports on the relationship between most serious charge (MSC) and age. In Saskatchewan , due to small numbers, an analysis of age and most serious charge was limited. However, the available evidence suggests that older youth were more likely than younger youth to be charged with an offence against the person. Forty-nine percent of the 16-17 year olds were charged with an offence against the person, compared to 41% of the 15-16 year olds. Meanwhile, 53% of the 14-15 year olds were charged with a property-related offence, compared to 33% of the 16-17 year olds.


[1] The analysis of MSC involves much smaller numbers in comparison to MSO; hence, the figures in this section are more susceptible to large fluctuations when calculating proportions (they are more volatile).

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