A One-Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custody Across Canada

Chapter 7 - Saskatchewan (continued)

7.6 Sentence Length

Figure 7.6 and Table 7.5 describes the various sentence lengths being served by Aboriginal youth included in the Saskatchewan snapshot. Twenty-two percent of youth were sentenced to custody for 300 to 399 days, followed by those sentenced to 150-199 days (18%), 500-749 days (11%) and 50-99 days (10%). Two-fifths (42%) of the youth were sentenced for 1 to 199 days. Meanwhile, more than one-half (57%) of the youth were sentenced to 1 to 299 days. The median custody length was 265 days.

Figure 7.6 Sentence Length Being Served on Snapshot Day

Figure 7.6 - Sentence Length Being Served on Snapshot Day
[Description]

Sentence Length Data was missing for 1 youth.
Source: One-Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custody (2001).
Prepared by: Research and Statistics Division, Department of Justice Canada .

Data concerning sentence length must be interpreted with caution, as longer sentences are more likely to be captured in a one-day snapshot than are shorter ones; hence, the former may be over-represented in the results. Therefore, the sentence distribution in Figure 7.5 and Table 7.5 (and the median custody length) do not necessarily represent typical sentence lengths.

A larger proportion of females than males was sentenced to custody for less than 99 days (31% versus 13%). In fact, 65% of the females were sentenced to 199 days or less, compared to 38% of the males.

Older youth tended to serve longer sentences in comparison to younger youth. For instance, 72% of those 18 years of age and older were serving a sentence for 200 days or more, compared to 62% of the 16-17 year olds, 44% of the 14-15 year olds, and 50% of the 12-13 year olds. Meanwhile, 26% of the 14-15 year olds were serving a sentence of 99 days or less, compared to 14% of the 16-17 year olds. However, revealing that older youth were serving longer sentences than younger youth was expected given that older youth - especially those 18 years of age and older - would need to be serving long sentences to still be in a youth facility (see Table 7.5).

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