A One-Day Snapshot of Aboriginal Youth in Custody Across Canada : Phase II

3. SNAPSHOT RESULTS ( cont'd )

3. SNAPSHOT RESULTS ( cont'd )

3.3 Custodial Status of Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth

As indicated in Figure 3: relatively the same proportion of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth were serving secure custody (34% versus 29%) and open custody (32% versus 33%) sentences. As well, relatively the same proportion of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth in custody were on remand (39% versus 43%).

Figure 3: Custodial Status of Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth

Figure 3 - Custodial Status of Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth

[Description of Figure 3]

1. Total percentage is greater than 100% as youth may have been on remand and serving either an open or secure sentence concurrently.

3.4 Most Serious Offence for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

Aboriginal youth were more likely to be incarcerated for some of the more serious offences compared to non-Aboriginal youth (see Figure 4). A greater proportion of Aboriginal youth was in custody for 'homicide/attempted homicide', 'serious assault', and 'serious sexual assault' compared to non-Aboriginal youth. Non-Aboriginal youth were more likely to be incarcerated for robbery and some of the less serious offences, such as 'administration of justice', 'other property offences', and 'drug possession', compared to Aboriginal youth.

Figure 4: Most Serious Offence Groupings for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody M

Figure 4 - Most Serious Offence Groupings for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

[Description of Figure 4]

3.5 Most Serious Charge for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth on Remand

Figure 5 provides the proportion of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth on remand by offence groupings. As with custodial sentences, Aboriginal youth were more likely to be on remand for some of the more serious offences and non-Aboriginal youth were more likely to be on remand for some of the less serious offences.

Figure 5: Most Serious Charge Groupings for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth on Remand

Figure 5 - Most Serious Charge Groupings for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth on Remand

[Description of Figure 5]

3.6 Sentence Lengths for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

The median sentence length for Aboriginal youth in custody was 212 days while the median sentence length for non-Aboriginal youth in custody was 182 days. [10] Figure 6 provides the median sentence length for both groups across offence groupings. Aboriginal youth received longer sentence lengths, on average, within many offence groupings, and particularly in the 'serious assault', 'serious sexual assault', 'robbery', and 'other violent offences' groupings. Non-Aboriginal youth received longer sentences, on average, for several less serious offences such as those in the 'driving' and 'drug possession' groupings. The sentence lengths for the 'homicide/attempted homicide' category were too large to include in Figure 6.

Figure 6: Median Sentence Length for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

Figure 6 - Median Sentence Length for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

[Description of Figure 6]

3.7 Gender and Age of Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

Table 3 provides the gender and age breakdowns for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth in custody. Aboriginal youth in custody were more likely to be younger than non-Aboriginal youth. As well, there was a higher proportion of Aboriginal females in custody compared to non-Aboriginal females.

Table 3, Gender and Age of Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Youth in Custody

Age
  Aboriginal n (column %) Non-Aboriginal n (column%)
12 to 15 year olds 241 (34) 408 (28)
16 and 17 year olds 390 (54) 788 (53)
18+ years old 86 (12) 284 (19)
Gender
  Aboriginal n (column %) Non-Aboriginal n (column%)
Male 600 (84) 1312 (88)
Female 118 (16) 172 (12)

1. Frequencies do not total 2,212 due to missing data.


[10] This comparison does not control for two of the more important factors typically considered in sentencing - criminal history and the severity of the offence.

Date modified: