Departmental Performance Report 2011-12
Supplementary Information Tables

Details of Transfer Payment Programs

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund (Voted)

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 2003
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The purpose of the Initiative in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages is to improve the capacity of the justice system to serve Canadians in both official languages. The Initiative is part of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future, announced by the federal government in June 2008. It includes a consulting mechanism, a justice training component, a component to encourage young bilingual Canadians to pursue law-related careers in justice, and a grants and contributions funding program titled "Access to Justice in both Official Languages Support Fund." Its objectives are to increase the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer justice services in both official languages and to increase awareness in the legal community and official language minority and majority communities concerning their rights and issues related to access to justice in both official languages.

Recipients:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations
  • Provincial and territorial governments, regional and municipal governments, provincial and territorial Crown corporations
  • Canadian institutions/boards of education, including Centres for jurilinguistics

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

Results achieved

  • Justice Canada (JUS) worked collaboratively with its partners to implement the justice training in both official languages component. Seventeen (17) projects related to advance training focusing on legal terminology for bilingual justice professionals were funded.
  • JUS financed numerous projects related to continued judicial awareness and information activities in order to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages. The funded projects consist namely of:
    • Eight (8) projects to support the ongoing activities of French-speaking jurists associations and their Federation;
    • Two (2) projects that contribute to the development of a curriculum for bilingual students interested in pursuing a career in the field of justice;
    • Six (6) projects that are aimed at elaborating a recruitment strategy and the promotion of justice-related careers;
    • Nine (9) projects that are focused on developing linguistic training tools; and
    • Nineteen (19) projects aimed at increasing awareness or providing public legal information.
  • The Department held an Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Consultative Committee meeting on March 16, 2012, to engage the official language minority communities. The objective of the meeting was to discuss challenges related to access to justice in both official languages, explore the concept of service centers and how these could be applied in the justice context, and provide information on projects that were funded through the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund.
Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total grants $0 $24,050 $50,000 $50,000 $28,226 $21,774
Total contributions $3,295,230 $4,471,689 $7,175,845 $6,975,845 $6,110,114 $865,731
Total program activity $3,295,230 $4,495,739 $7,225,845 $7,025,845 $6,138,340 $887,505

Comments on variances

The work on a multi-year funding project for a jurilinguistic web portal was delayed for a few months at the beginning of the fiscal year which impacted the actual spending for 2011-12. In addition, many projects required a more in-depth review and, as a consequence, delayed funding in 2011-12.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The results of the case studies that were undertaken in 2010-11 were communicated to Official Language Minority Communities in August 2011 and were also utilized for the Summative Evaluation of the Support Fund that was undertaken in 2011 and completed in 2012. The evaluation report will be made available on the departmental website in 2012-13.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department continued to engage its stakeholders from official language minority communities during the March 16, 2012 meeting of the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Consultative Committee. The meeting enabled participants to discuss the challenges related to access to justice in both official languages and explore the concept of service centres and how these could be applied in the justice context.

The Department held a Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Working Group meeting on February 16 and 17, 2012, with representatives from the Department of Justice and Francophone Affairs to explore models to improve Access to Justice in Both Official Languages.

Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 1991 as Aboriginal Justice Initiative, renewed as Aboriginal Justice Strategy in 1996, 2002, 2007
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) enables Aboriginal communities to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice and provides timely and effective alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. AJS programs are also aimed at reducing the rates of victimization; crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs; and, helping the mainstream justice system become more responsive and sensitive to the needs and culture of Aboriginal communities.

Recipients:

  • bands, First Nations, Tribal Councils, local, regional and national Aboriginal organizations;
  • agencies and institutions of regional/municipal governments;
  • non-profit community organizations, societies, and associations which have voluntarily associated themselves for a non-profit purpose;
  • provincial and territorial governments;
  • individuals; and
  • for-profit corporations, so long as these corporations will not make a profit on the work performed.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

In 2011-12, approximately 275 AJS community-based justice programs provided services to over 600 Aboriginal communities across Canada, and 19 AJS capacity-building and training projects reached over 150 Aboriginal communities across Canada.

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total grants $85,836 $62,702 $260,000 $21,665 $21,573 $92
Total contributions $11,904,293 $11,942,639 $12,240,000 $12,038,335 $11,942,714 $95,621
Total program activity $11,990,129 $12,005,341 $12,500,000 $12,060,000 $11,964,287 $95,713

Comments on variances

An earlier Capacity-Building Fund call for proposals allowed the AJS to expend the majority of its allocated grant funding in 2011-12. As well, given that it was the last year of the AJS five-year mandate, negotiations were limited as funding agreements were ending. However, through regular monitoring and all efforts made by AJS recipients to expend all community-based program funds, a variance of $95,713 remained.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The AJS evaluation final report was completed in November 2011. It is available on the Justice Canada website: /eng/pi/eval/rep-rap/11/ajs-sja/index.html.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Aboriginal Justice Directorate conducted dialogue sessions with recipients and other stakeholders along the justice continuum. Feedback was gathered to support the renewal of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy. Two dialogue sessions were held in 2011-12.

Aboriginal Courtwork Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Aboriginal Courtwork Program (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 1978
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The objective of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program is to improve access to justice by helping Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. It is the only ongoing justice related program available to all Aboriginal people (adult and youth), regardless of status and residency. The Program provides Aboriginal persons charged with an offence with timely and accurate information on their rights, obligations, roles and responsibilities at the earliest possible stage of the criminal justice process. Services also include referring clients to appropriate legal and social resources in their community. Aboriginal Courtworkers serve as a "bridge" between criminal justice officials and Aboriginal people and communities by providing information, cultural context, and liaison, and promoting communications and understanding.

Recipients: Federal contributions will be made to provincial governments to provide Aboriginal Courtwork services to Aboriginal persons (adults and youths) charged with an offence under any federal or provincial statute or municipal by-law. A province may authorize one or more agencies to deliver Aboriginal Courtwork services on its behalf. All designated delivery agencies will be accountable to the funders. In addition, a separate component of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program entitled Projects in Support of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program, provides modest support for projects that further the mandate of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

Results achieved

  • Contribution agreements with participating provinces supported the delivery of Aboriginal Courtwork services to ensure access to justice for Aboriginal people within the mainstream Canadian justice system that promoted fair, equitable and culturally relevant treatment before the courts. Over 190 Aboriginal Courtworkers employed by over 20 different service delivery agencies across Canada provided services to over 450 communities and approximately 52,102 clients.
  • Over the past four years, forty-seven (47) projects were supported. Contributions over the four year period totalled $2,050,523 for projects in support of Aboriginal Courtwork delivery agencies. The majority of the projects support training for Aboriginal Courtworkers.
Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total contributions $5,366,085 $5,352,416 $4,911,363 $5,411,363 $5,411,363 $0
Total program activity $5,366,085 $5,352,416 $4,911,363 $5,411,363 $5,411,363 $0

Comments on variances

N/A

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

A national court official survey was completed in 2011-12. A national client survey also was completed in 2011-12. Both surveys will be used as key lines of evidence to inform the summative evaluation currently underway in 2012-13.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engaged applicants and recipients through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Working Group on the Aboriginal Courtwork Program which serves as a resource for issues related to the Program and to Aboriginal people in the justice system. Engagement was also accomplished through the Tripartite Working Group on the Aboriginal Courtwork Program which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussion of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning the Program. In 2011-12, recipients were engaged in the development of new National Data Requirements for the program. Recipient feedback was incorporated in the development of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program renewal strategy and the national court official, client and Courtworker surveys were undertaken in collaboration with recipients.

Legal Aid Systems

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Legal Aid Systems (Voted)
Start Date
August 17, 1971
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The objective of the federal Legal Aid Program is to contribute to sustaining a national system of justice that helps to ensure that economically disadvantaged persons have access to the justice system, through contribution funding in support of criminal, youth criminal justice and immigration and refugee legal aid services provided by the provinces (funding for criminal and civil legal aid in the territories is provided through the Access to Justice Agreements).

Recipients: Provinces

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

Provinces were enabled to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total contributions $125,827,507 $124,572,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $0
Total program activity $125,827,507 $124,572,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $0

Comments on variances

N/A

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The evaluation final report was completed in January 2012. It is available on the Justice Canada website: /eng/pi/eval/rep-rap/12/lap-paj/index.html.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Permanent Working Group on Legal Aid (PWG). The PWG was created as a forum for discussion and joint policy development in legal aid matters. The resultant collaboration promotes the development and implementation of legal aid policy in Canada.

Youth Justice Services Funding Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Youth Justice Services Funding Program (Voted)
Start Date
April 2, 1984
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The overall objective of this Program is to support the policy directions of the Youth Justice Initiative. The specific objectives of the individual agreements are to support and promote an appropriate range of programs and services that encourage accountability measures for unlawful behaviour that are proportionate and timely; encourage the effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into their communities; target the formal court process to the most serious offences; and target detention and custody to the most serious offences.

Recipients:

  • Provinces and territories

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

Provinces and territories were supported in providing an appropriate range of youth justice programs and services that encouraged timely and proportionate accountability measures for unlawful behaviour; encouraged effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons; and targeted the formal court process, detention and custody to the most serious offenders.

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total contributions $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $0
Total program activity $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $0

Comments on variances

N/A

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Recipients were engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Working Group on Youth Justice Cost Sharing and Programs which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussions of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning youth corrections. Recipient feedback in 2011-12 highlighted the importance of inter-system cooperation for mental health services and the sharing of best practices.

Supporting Families Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Supporting Families Fund (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 2009
End Date
March 31, 2014

Description

The Supporting Families Fund is a key component of the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative (SFI), which was announced by the Minister of Justice in September 2008. The fund is aimed at facilitating access to the family justice system for families experiencing separation and divorce through various services, programs, and information resources, particularly those that promote compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. The Fund also supports projects that promote public awareness about parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system.

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments, agencies, or other organizations designated by provincial and territorial governments as responsible for child support, the enforcement of support orders and agreements and parenting arrangement programs and services, are eligible to apply for contribution funding under the Family Justice Initiatives and the Pilot Projects components of the Fund.

Any of the following may apply for contribution or class grant funding under the Fund's Public Legal Education and Information and Professional Training component:

  • individuals
  • non-profit professional organizations, societies or associations
  • other non-profit organizations, societies or associations
  • educational institutions
  • private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects in partnership with federal, provincial, or territorial governments

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

Funding support under the Family Justice Initiatives component of the Fund for provincial and territorial family justice programs and services assisted families experiencing separation and divorce to deal with child/spousal support, support/access enforcement, and parenting arrangement issues, thus facilitating access to the family justice system for these families.

Funding was also provided to provinces and territories under the pilot project component of the Fund to develop implement and evaluate innovative family justice services with a focus on compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. Funded pilot projects in 2011-12 included:

  • on-line Family Law Information Centre (FLIC) Program and Differential Response to Conflict Assessment projects in Nova Scotia;
  • Family Law Information Program for Aboriginal families and Assessment of the Supervised Visitation Program in Ontario;
  • Distance family mediation in British Columbia; and
  • Saint John Family Law Pilot Project in New Brunswick.

These pilot projects promoted accessibility of custody/access, support and enforcement services for separating and divorcing families including those that face barriers in accessing the family justice system.

Non-governmental organizations were also provided funding under the Public Legal Education and Information and Professional Training component of the Fund for their family law related projects. These projects promoted awareness and understanding of parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system with a particular focus on the family law information needs of parents and communities that face barriers in accessing the family justice system.

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total grants $29,970 $23,249 $50,000 $10,000 $10,000 $0
Total contributions $15,847,819 $15,975,107 $15,950,000 $15,990,000 $15,989,910 $90
Total program activity $15,877,789 $15,998,356 $16,000,000 $16,000,000 $15,999,910 $90

Comments on variances

No comment due to minimal variance.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The impact evaluation of the Supporting Families Initiative (SFI) will be initiated in 2012-13, so that results will be available before the SFI's funding cycle is completed in March 2014.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

  • Providing information to the applicants by posting funding information on the Department website and via telephone and e-mail;
  • Obtaining feedback from funding recipients by using feedback form to improve program funding process;
  • Responding to questions from funding recipients via telephone, e-mail or face to face meetings regarding proposal development and throughout the funding process; and
  • Through the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials - Family Justice Committee, sought feedback and collaboration from provincial and territorial governments, recipients of family justice services funding, on funding criteria, final reporting template and collection of program data to inform the Impact evaluation of the SFI.

Victims of Crime Initiative

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Victims of Crime Initiative (voted)
Start Date
April 1, 2005
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The Victims Fund is a grants and contributions fund with broad terms and conditions designed to raise awareness and enhance services and assistance to victims of crime. The Victims Fund is administered by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues and provides support to victims of crime as well as to governmental and non-governmental organizations to implement a wide range of victim-focused projects and activities. Planned spending for 2011-12 and onwards does not reflect the Funding for the Federal Victim Strategy which sunsets on March 31, 2011; however, its renewal is being sought by the Department.

Recipients:

  • individuals;
  • national, provincial, territorial, municipal, Aboriginal, community or professional organizations, societies or associations;
  • Canadian educational institutions/boards of education;
  • International governmental and non-governmental organizations, including bodies associated or affiliated with organizations of which Canada is a member, which have as their purpose victim advocacy, services, assistance or raising awareness about the impact of victimization;
  • private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects;
  • bands, tribal councils and self-governing First Nations who are working to provide services and assistance to victims of crime in Aboriginal communities; and
  • provincial, territorial, municipal and regional governments and agencies.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

In 2011-12 the Victims Fund provided:

  • $1,128,093.00 in funding to establish or enhance thirteen (13) Child Advocacy Centres;
  • $556,945.00 in funding for projects in support of concrete actions on missing and murdered Aboriginal women;
  • $238,219.71 in direct funding to thirty-two (32) Canadians victimized abroad and forty-four (44) support persons (See section 19 Engagement of applicants and recipients for specific results);
  • $118,520.00 in emergency financial assistance to thirty-four (34) victims of crime.
  • $644,660.00 in funding for 128 events to mark National Victims of Crime Awareness Week 2011;
  • $318,892.00 in funding for 388 victims and ninety-two (92) support persons to attend Parole Board of Canada hearings (See section on Engagement of applicants and recipients for specific results);
  • $1,712,025.00 to fund 162 projects across Canada to deliver services to victims and/or raise awareness about victim issues; and
  • $2,978,523.00 in funding to provinces and territories to support the development, enhancement and delivery of victim services.
Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total grants $842,605 $847,249 $350,000 $2,850,000 $977,052 $1,872,948
Total contributions $4,067,867 $6,179,736 $4,736,556 $7,336,556 $6,922,787 $413,769
Total program activity $4,910,472 $7,026,985 $5,086,556 $10,186,556 $7,899,839 $2,286,717

Comments on variances

Victims Fund spending has steadily increased over the past three years with lapses substantially decreasing each year. Increased Victims Fund spending is due to outreach efforts by Policy Centre for Victim Issues (PCVI) officials, improved capacity in provincial and territorial governments to uptake funding, and new funding areas such as child advocacy centres and the families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women. In 2011-12, a new approval process for grants and contributions under the Victims Fund was implemented resulting in delays in project approvals and fewer projects being approved overall. Funding for Canadians victimized abroad will always be subject to variance due to the fact that the number of Canadians who are victimized while abroad each year is unpredictable.

Going forward, provincial and territorial governments will benefit from multi-year funding agreements providing those jurisdictions with the flexibility to address priorities for victims. Additionally, implementation of new terms and conditions for the Victims Fund, which came into effect on April 5, 2012, will respond to recommendations of the 2010 evaluation of the Federal Victim Strategy and improve the flexibility of the Victims Fund to meet the objectives of the Federal Victim Strategy.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

A summative evaluation of the Federal Victims Strategy was completed in 2010 and approved by the Department of Justice Audit Management Response and Evaluation Committee in February 2011. The evaluation concluded that the Federal Victims Strategy is aligned with the Government of Canada priorities and that the Policy Centre for Victim Issues achieves high results at a low cost. The Evaluation and Management Response can be found at the following link: /eng/pi/eval/2011.html.

The next evaluation of the Federal Victims Strategy is planned for 2015.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

  • Providing information to potential applicants by posting funding information on the Department's website and via telephone and e-mail;
  • Responding to questions from funding applicants and recipients via telephone, e-mail or face to face meetings regarding proposal development and throughout the funding process;
  • Obtaining direct feedback from funding recipients through surveys to improve the program funding process. 2011-12 findings: All respondents who received funding to assist them as a result of being victimized abroad indicated that the funding was extremely useful, that they wouldn't have been able to cover any of the costs/expenses if no funding had been available, and that the financial assistance was extremely important in encouraging them to participate in criminal proceedings abroad. Similarly, of those victims of crime who completed a survey about the funding they received to travel to Parole Board of Canada hearings, 98% reported that the funding was helpful, 89% indicated that they were very satisfied or satisfied with their funding experience, and over half reported that they would not have attended the hearing of the person who harmed them had that financial assistance not been available;
  • Promoting the Victims Fund at meetings with stakeholders, criminal justice associations, and with criminal justice system partners;
  • Promoting the Victims Fund in Policy Centre for Victim Issues (PCVI) publications and newsletters;
  • Regular communication with the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Victims of Crime to engage key partners in meeting the objectives of the Federal Victims Strategy and the Victims Fund; and,
  • Addressing the findings of the 2010 Federal Victims Strategy evaluation by amending the terms and conditions of the Victims Fund and changing internal processes.

Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 2002
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist the provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other sentencing options applicable under the Act to serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems. It is expected that these services might reduce the likelihood of further violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences.

Recipients: Provinces and territories.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

Provinces and territories had the financial capacity to implement sentencing options that involved specialized treatment programs to address the mental health issues of serious violent youth offenders. During 2011-12, a total of nineteen (19) Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) orders were issued by the courts and became eligible for federal funding, bringing the total number of active IRCS cases funded to fifty (50). In addition, another ten (10) exceptional cases were approved for funding during 2011-2012, bringing the total number of other active cases to thirteen (13).

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total contributions $10,561,587 $10,929,773 $11,048,000 $11,048,000 $10,701,290 $346,710
Total program activity $10,561,587 $10,929,773 $11,048,000 $11,048,000 $10,701,290 $346,710

Comments on variances

Spending under this Program is largely dependent on court decisions and as such remains highly unpredictable.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Recipients were engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Working Group on Youth Justice Cost Sharing and Programs which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussions of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning youth corrections as they related to serious violent youth offenders with mental health issues. In 2011-12, recipient feedback was incorporated into the development of standardized reporting requirements for Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) cases which will facilitate future evaluation efforts of the Program.

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 2008
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The Contraventions Act allows the federal government to designate federal statutory offences as contraventions so that they can be processed using a ticketing regime, thus reducing the burden on the court system, reducing the costs for the accused and the government, and limiting the impact of a conviction based on a federal offence. The Act authorizes the federal government to sign administration agreements with provinces, territories and municipalities allowing the federal government to use existing provincial penal regimes to prosecute federal contraventions. The Contraventions Act Fund provides funding to provinces, territories and municipalities that have signed administration agreements so that they can implement the Act in a manner consistent with the applicable constitutional language rights laws involving compliance with judicial services (section 530 and 530.1 of the Criminal Code) and extra-judicial services (Part IV of the Official Languages Act).

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments and agencies and municipalities designated by provincial and territorial governments as being responsible for judicial activities and for providing extra-judicial services in both official languages.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

  • With the signing of a new agreement with Prince Edward Island in December 2011, there are now five jurisdictions (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island) and one municipality (Mississauga) that have entered into an agreement that includes language rights provisions funded by the Contraventions Act Fund with the Department and, as a result, are fully prepared to ensure on behalf of the federal government judicial and extra judicial services in both official languages in compliance with the Criminal Code and the Official Languages Act.
  • The Department has continued to actively pursue its undertakings with Newfoundland and Labrador in 2011-12, and in February 2012, an in-person meeting was planned with the province and scheduled for late May 2012 with a view to discuss and agree on specific steps towards the signing of an implementation agreement containing language rights provisions.
  • The Department also exchanged relevant information with Saskatchewan regarding the implementation of the Act.
  • Preliminary discussions took place internally regarding the implementation of the contraventions regime in the Northwest Territories involving the Department's regional office.
  • Discussions towards a revised agreement with Québec resulted in a final new agreement that was prepared for signature at the end of March 2012.
Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total contributions $4,580,600 $4,541,496 $9,094,900 $8,862,687 $4,929,750 $3,932,937
Total program activity $4,580,600 $4,541,496 $9,094,900 $8,862,687 $4,929,750 $3,932,937

Comments on variances

Only provinces/territories/municipalities are eligible for funding under the Fund. The Department continues to work diligently to move negotiations forward towards getting the provinces/territories/municipalities to sign Contraventions Act administration and enforcement agreements containing language rights provisions supported by the Fund; however, negotiations and anticipated and actual progress depend largely on the priorities and therefore capacity of the provinces. Only when all jurisdictions have signed agreements will the Fund be completely committed.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The summative evaluation of the Fund was undertaken in 2011-12, completed in 2012, and approved in March 2012. The evaluation report will be made available on the departmental website in 2012-13.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department engaged its provincial and territorial stakeholders regarding the implementation of the Contraventions Act during the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group meeting held on February 16-17, 2012. In addition, the Department established the Contraventions Act Practice Group which brings together legal counsel from departmental Legal Services Units involved in issues related to contraventions. Three meetings were held during 2011-12.

Youth Justice Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Youth Justice Fund (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 1999
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The overall objective of funding under the Youth Justice Fund is to encourage a fairer and more effective youth justice system. Funding is available for community and Aboriginal organizations, provinces/territories and their agencies, and other youth justice stakeholders for innovative pilot projects and related activities, such as training and evaluation. Priorities are set annually based on identified needs and emerging federal youth justice priorities.

A variety of activities are eligible for funding support under the Youth Justice Fund. These include, among others:

  • The development, implementation, testing and evaluation of pilot projects dealing with youth involved in the criminal justice system. These projects often address youth with specific issues, such as Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, mental health issues, substance abuse or gang involvement;
  • Training and educational activities for youth justice professionals and community service providers; and
  • Research activities which contribute to policy development.

Recipients: Community and Aboriginal organizations, provinces, territories and their agencies and other youth justice stakeholders.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

The Youth Justice Fund committed support to:

  • seventeen (17) projects to promote the making of "smart choices" through community-based educational, cultural, sporting and vocational opportunities for youth involved in gun, gang and drug activities;
  • sixteen (16) projects for treatment targeting young persons in conflict with the law who have illicit substance abuse issues; and
  • thirteen (13) projects targeting other priorities, including youth in conflict with the law with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

Note, some projects targeted more than one of the above priorities.

The Fund initiated a call for proposals to provinces and territories in 2011-12 for projects relating to gang-involved youth in custody. It also sought proposals for projects looking into effective substance-abuse treatment for youth affected with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total grants $632,739 $674,678 $330,000 $730,000 $180,007 $549,993
Total contributions $3,796,700 $3,770,350 $2,175,000 $4,275,000 $2,752,284 $1,522,716
Total program activity $4,429,439 $4,445,028 $2,505,000 $5,005,000 $2,932,291 $2,072,709

Comments on variances

The Youth Justice Fund's variance increased in 2011-12 due to the timing of the confirmation of the continuation of the funding for the Gangs, Guns and Drugs component, and new approval procedures.

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The Youth Justice Fund was evaluated as part of the 2010 Youth Justice Funding Components Evaluation.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Youth Justice Fund works closely with applicants, beginning with discussions on the project concept, to the development of the Letter of Intent, to the final project proposal stage.

On March 8-9, 2012, pilot project proponents supported by the Drug Treatment component of the Fund were provided with the opportunity to share promising practices and lessons learned from their projects at the Symposium on Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment for Vulnerable Youth held in Toronto. Additionally, one proponent was given the opportunity to share learning from his project via a departmentally-sponsored webcast on The Use of the Arts to Foster Resilience in Youth in Conflict with the Law.

Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories (in the areas of Legal Aid, Aboriginal Courtwork and Public Legal Education and Information Services)

Name of Transfer Payment Program
Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories (in the areas of Legal Aid, Aboriginal Courtwork and Public Legal Education and Information Services) (Voted)
Start Date
April 1, 1996
End Date
Ongoing

Description

The goal of the Access to Justice Services Agreements is to integrate federal government funding support to Canada's three territories for access to justice services (including criminal and civil legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork, and Public Legal Education and Information) through ongoing contribution agreements that allow the territories the flexibility needed to provide these services in a challenging environment (vast distances, harsh climate, cultural/linguistic differences). The overarching goal of federal support for Aboriginal Courtwork services is to facilitate and enhance access to justice by assisting Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system to obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. With regard to legal aid services in the territories, the federal goal is to enable the territories to provide legal aid services to economically disadvantaged persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice and civil matters. And, with respect to public legal education and information, the goal is to assist the territories in providing members of the public with the legal information they need to make informed decisions and participate effectively in the justice system.

Recipients: Territorial governments that undertake to provide services to eligible persons and eligible young persons in matters relating to the overall objectives of the Access to Justice Services Agreements. The territories may authorize entities ("territorial access to justice services delivery entities") to provide services in these matters.

Strategic outcome

A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results achieved

Through the Access to Justice Service contribution agreements, the three territories are enabled to provide access to justice services in the areas of legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork and public legal education and information.

Program Activity: Justice Policies, Laws and Programs
  2009–10
Actual
spending
2010–11
Actual
spending
2011–12
Planned
spending
2011–12
Total
authorities
2011–12
Actual
spending
Variance
Total contributions $5,156,593 $4,856,593 $4,856,593 $4,856,593 $4,856,593 $0
Total program activity $5,156,593 $4,856,593 $4,856,593 $4,856,593 $4,856,593 $0

Comments on variances

N/A

Audits completed or planned

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned

The Access to Justice Service Agreements Evaluation will be completed in the Fall of 2012-2013.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Recipients were engaged through Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Working Groups: through the Permanent Working Group (PWG) on Legal Aid for the legal aid component; the FPT Working Group on the Aboriginal Courtwork Program which serves as a resource for issues related to the Program and to Aboriginal people in the justice system; and, through the Tripartite Working Group on Aboriginal Courtwork Program which serves as a forum for ongoing monitoring and discussion of inter-jurisdictional issues concerning the Aboriginal Courtwork Program. In 2011-12, recipient feedback was instrumental to negotiation of future year agreements and ongoing consultations regarding policy and funding issues as well the development of the first ever Access to Justice Service Agreements evaluation framework.

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