Departmental Performance Report 2012-13
Supplementary Information Tables

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative

National Anti-Drug Strategy

Name of lead department

Department of Justice Canada

Lead department PAA Program

Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2012-13 [1]

End date of the horizontal initiative

2016-17 and Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (from start to end date)

$515.9M

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement)

The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The Prevention Action Plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and to develop and implement community-based interventions and initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The Treatment Action Plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The Enforcement Action Plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared outcomes

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts for illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and,
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance structure

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and Director General level working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions and makes recommendations for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention Action Plan and Treatment Action Plans, as well as the work of a Prevention and Treatment Sub-Working Group. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy, which includes making the decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative to the public and stakeholder groups and ensuring coordination of such communications. It also oversees the work of a Communications Sub-Working Group.

Performance highlights

In 2012-13, the Strategy entered its second five year reporting cycle. The 12 federal partner departments and agencies involved in the Strategy continued their work to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent illicit drug use, treat dependency, and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs. Components of the Strategy associated with Mandatory Minimum Penalties for serious drug offences, whose funds were held in frozen allotment until the passage of the Safe Streets and Communities Act, which received Royal Assent in March 2012, began to be implemented.

Partners also collectively worked to implement the actions set out in the Management Response and Action Plan to the 2012 Impact Evaluation of the Strategy. The main areas of focus included strengthening the governance of the Strategy, communication and knowledge-sharing activities, and improvements to the monitoring and evaluation activities.

As well, partners collaborated to discuss relevant policy issues, such as prescription drug abuse, and to contribute to international discussions, for example, through the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD), the Organization for American States (OAS), and the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

The following tables present the performance results for each federal partner's programs.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice Canada

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
A1 – Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework a. Drug Treatment Court Funding Program

(Treatment Action Plan)
$18.2M $3.6M $3.6M Link 1 Link 1
b. Youth Justice Fund

(Treatment Action Plan)
$7.9M $1.6M $1.4M Link 2 Link 2
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.2M $0.2M $0.3M Link 3 Link 3
C1 – Internal Services d. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.1M $0.2M $0.1M
e. National Anti-Drug Strategy $0.2M $0.0M $0.0M Support programs  
Total $28.5M $5.7M [2] $5.5M [2]    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) premiums and exclude Accommodation premiums.
Amounts may not add up due to rounding.

Expected Results for 2012–13:
Link 1
  • Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.
Link 2
Overall Results:
  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.
Immediate Outcomes:
  • Projects on treatment services and program enhancements.
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations.
Intermediate Outcomes:
  • Increased availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for targeted populations in areas of need.
  • Improved treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in targeted populations in areas of need.
Link 3

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • Exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • Maintaining the Strategy's Governance Structure;
  • Leading and coordinating all Strategy communications activities; and
  • Taking lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation and performance reporting.
Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

Drug Treatment Court (DTC) pilots contribute to a reduction in criminal recidivism as well as a reduction in illicit drug use while in the program. Data collected through the Drug Treatment Court Information System show that drug treatment court clients had clean urine screen tests (i.e. no drug use) 65% of the time that they were in the program.

Link 2

In 2012-13, the Youth Justice Fund committed support to 23 projects to enhance capacity to plan/deliver a range of drug treatment services and programs targeted at young people in conflict with the law. Seven pilot projects were approved or ongoing in 2012-13; two other pilot projects were co-funded through the Guns, Gangs and Drugs component and the Drug Treatment component of the Youth Justice Fund as they had an emphasis on youth affected by both these issues. Through a call for proposals, 10 projects provided training for frontline workers or community assessments to increase the effectiveness of efforts to address substance abuse by youth involved in the youth criminal justice system. Two research projects focused on best practices and potential interventions for youth with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder or other cognitive impairments, who also struggle with substance abuse. There were also two projects with provinces which focused on training for frontline staff. The total value of projects with a focus on drug treatment for 2012-13 was $181,985 in grants and $1,114,727 in contributions.

Link 3

Effective coordination of the federal response to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs through:

  • Exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • Organizing senior-level committee meetings to discuss future activities, policy, communications, and evaluation and performance reporting;
  • Coordinating National Anti-Drug Strategy communication activities and developing a Communications Strategy;
  • Taking lead responsibility for performance reporting, including undertaking consultations with partners to inform development of a Performance Measurement Strategy for the current five year reporting cycle; and
  • Leading implementation of actions identified in the Management Response and Action Plan to the 2012 Impact Evaluation of the Strategy.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
2.5.2 Controlled Substances b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)

(Prevention Action Plan)
$48.0M $9.6M $9.8M Link 1 Link 1
c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$80.4M $27.6M $27.9M Link 2 Link 2
3.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$45.5M $9.1M $10.4M Link 3 Link 3
2.5.2 Controlled Substances e. Office of Controlled Substances $19.1M $3.8M $2.2M Link 4 Link 4
Transfer to Regional Programs Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$6.1M $1.2M $1.2M
f. Drug Analysis Services
(Enforcement Action Plan)**
$17.3M $3.46M $3.46M Link 5 Link 5
$4.5M $0.9M $0.9M
Total $220.9M $55.7M $55.9M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums.
Amounts may not add up due to rounding.
** Includes Mandatory Minimum Penalties

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1

DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will also be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration of evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Link 2

DTFP plans to increase availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available by end of the fiscal year and will be measured by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need.

DTFP will also seek to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians. The program's success and progress will be measured by: the extent to which treatment system improvements have been made; perceptions of stakeholders; and the extent to which uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred.

Link 3

First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to increase the availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by the nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices. FNIHB also plans to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. Progress will be measured by:

  • the proportion of treatment facilities accredited;
  • the proportion of addictions counsellors in treatment centres who are certified;
  • the changes in stakeholder perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in Strategy-supported investment areas; and
  • the types of collaborative/partnerships with Aboriginal organizations to strengthen systems, programs and services.
Link 4

The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) plans to reduce the risk of diversion of precursor chemicals by using Strategy funding to improve processes for the issuance of precursor licenses and permits. This will include reviewing and streamlining guidance provided to regulated parties involved in carrying out activities with precursor chemicals, and to law enforcement regarding the application for authorization to dispose of seized controlled substances. The OCS will also strengthen the inspection program through the development of a quality assurance component to ensure consistency in inspections across the country. This includes the development of standardized tools with a national scope (i.e., policies, directives, inspection reports, monitoring letters and standard operating procedures, etc.). This framework will contribute to increased capacity in the control and monitoring of controlled substances and precursor chemicals. It will also include improving the tools used to record losses and thefts reported to the OCS by regulated parties.

Link 5

Drug Analysis Services (DAS) plans to improve drug enforcement intelligence and evidence. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the benefit and timeliness of DAS contribution to police response/court. DAS also plans to increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations. Success and progress will be measured by the number and nature of injuries to law enforcement officers and other first responders during the investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations, and will also be measured by the level of additional risk to the environment as a result of investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations.

Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

An analysis of findings from projects funded under the 2008 call for proposals shows that DSCIF projects are showing positive results and that the program is reaching its target population. Over 49,484 youth, 4,435 parents and 626 workers/schools have been reached through 29 DSCIF projects (reach of DSCIF projects will continue to be updated as projects are completed and reports are analyzed). Youth capacity (knowledge and skills) to avoid illicit drug use has been enhanced including the development of leadership skills, communication skills, positive supports/relationships, self-esteem and resiliency. For example, an evaluation of one project in Ontario found that 72.8% of participants agreed they had learned practical skills for handling the pressure to use drugs as a result of the project, and a project in British Columbia found a significant change in participant social skills when compared to a comparison group. DSCIF findings have also shown a positive impact on decision-making and behaviours related to youth illicit drug use including helping to resist peer pressure, changes in behaviour intention (i.e., youth believing they would not consume illicit drugs in the future) and changes in actual behaviour (i.e., reduction and/or cessation of drug use). For example, 95% of youth participants in a Saskatchewan project agreed that participating in the project made it less likely they would use drugs.

There is also some evidence to support the finding that DSCIF has led to strengthened community responses to illicit drug issues. Projects focused more on the community development side of DSCIF have increased access/availability and uptake of health prevention and promotion knowledge and resources and as a result of their projects, have implemented a number of new services, initiatives or programs. Information is being used in classroom settings, as part of youth workers' daily work and incorporated into strategic plans and community programming. Additionally, some projects have been expanded beyond the original scope of DSCIF and have achieved full or partial sustainability beyond DSCIF funding. Community engagement has also been shown to be an integral aspect of the DSCIF program. In fact, conclusions from case studies completed as part of the DSCIF cluster evaluation found that working collaboratively with existing and new partners appears to be inherent in how DSCIF projects are implemented.

Link 2

The DTFP was evaluated in 2012-13 on its relevance and performance. The evaluation found that DTFP was able to demonstrate progress towards all results. In particular, the evaluation concluded that all of the services projects contained evidence that projects led to either the enhancement of existing services or to the introduction of new services as a result of DTFP funding. Examples of new or enhanced services included: creation of mobile early intervention teams offering services to at-risk youth, placement of outreach workers in new regions, expansion of outreach services, increasing the number of hours that trained addictions counsellors spend in early treatment intervention for youth in high school settings, and hiring additional staff and creating inter-professional health teams. Representatives from approximately two-thirds of the services projects indicated their province or territory was delivering new services which were not provided prior to DTFP and their focus on horizontal integration and capacity building among frontline workers has led to enhanced service delivery. Additionally, 65% of survey respondents indicated that they believed their project was successful in helping at-risk individuals in their region more easily access drug treatment programs. A 2012-13 review of project reports found that over 25,000 youth have been reached with through various programs, outreach events, drop-in centres and requests for services.

DTFP has also made progress in improving treatment systems. The DTFP evaluation found that DTFP has had a positive impact on improving collaboration, implementation of evidence-based practices and enhancing evaluation and performance measurement capacity. All systems projects examined as part of the evaluation had developed a working/reference group or steering committee to bring together key partners and stakeholders across sectors and organizations as part of project implementation. Sixty-one percent of system and service stakeholders surveyed as part of a national systems project conducted by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse reported that collaboration and knowledge exchange were the most important contribution of their DTFP project to improvement of substance use services and supports in their jurisdictions. The DTFP evaluation also found evidence of the creation and dissemination of evidence-informed practice information including: literature reviews, research on best practices for intake, concurrent disorders and treatment/withdrawal management, revised policies, procedures, guidelines and standards, training programs and tools in evidence-based decision-making and change management and needs-based planning tools/models. Practice information was disseminated using vehicles such as knowledge exchange websites, web-based networks and knowledge exchange working groups/forums. Over 75% of survey respondents agreed that the DTFP project had either very successfully or somewhat successfully: increased the availability of evidence-informed practice information, made it easier to access evidence-informed practice information and improved the quality of evidence-informed practice information. Individual projects have reported integrating evidence-informed practice information into their systems, program and/or policies as part of their project level evaluation reports. A Tiered Model for the delivery of supports and services has been reflected in provincial addictions and mental health strategies released in Ontario, Alberta and New Brunswick. Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan have also used the Tiered Model as a framework for provincial-level system mapping exercises. Key informants from a DTFP project in Nova Scotia reported that as a result of the project, there has been a culture shift and the beginnings of a paradigm change in terms of valuing and using evidence.

Link 3

Through the National Anti-Drug Strategy, FNIHB supported a range of activities aimed at improving the quality, effectiveness and accessibility of addiction treatment for First Nations and Inuit. Key 2012-13 achievements include:

  • More treatment centres being re-profiled or expanded to effectively meet community needs (e.g., services for women, youth, or people with co-occurring mental health issues). Since 2007, 36 treatment centres have seen their services expanded or refocused to more effectively meet these community needs;
  • More treatment centres achieving accreditation. In 2012-13, 84% (46 of 55) of treatment centres were accredited, up from 82% (48 of 59) in 2011-12, 74% (43 of 58) in 2010-11 and 68% (40 of 57) in 2009-10;
  • More addiction workers receiving training and becoming certified with a recognized certification body. In 2012-13, the percentage of full-time treatment centre counsellors was 71% (251 of 353), remaining the same as in 2011-12 (71% or 235 of 333), up from 68% (186 of 272) in 2010-11; and
  • Completion of the evidence based review of on-reserve addiction services, which resulted in a new national framework that is guiding strengthened programming at community, regional and national levels.
Link 4

As part of the National Anti-Drug Strategy Enforcement Action Plan, the Office of Controlled Substances receives funding for compliance and enforcement activities. In 2012-13, the office issued: 272 licences for controlled drugs; 329 licences for precursor chemicals (Class A); 96 registrations for precursor chemicals (Class B); as well as 4,185 import and export permits for controlled drugs, and 1,160 import and export permits for precursor chemicals. The Office also issued 1,573 scientific exemptions, received 1,592 loss and theft reports, and processed 192,749 requests for authorization to destroy seized controlled substances. The Office continued to improve the internal procedures used in processing licence and permit applications.

The Office developed a risk-based model for its compliance and enforcement activities, with a view to improving the ability to target its activities to the regulated parties that pose the highest risk. Inspectors located in four regional offices carried out 161 inspections of licensed dealers for controlled drugs and 50 inspections of licensed dealers for precursor chemicals.

The Office promulgated the New Classes of Practitioners Regulations which authorize podiatrists, nurse practitioners and midwives to prescribe controlled substances when they are authorised to do so within their provincial/territorial scope of practice. The Office completed the scheduling of BZP, TFMPP and MDPV, three substances found in stimulant-type designer drugs.

Link 5

DAS contributed to improved intelligence and evidence to support drug enforcement and prosecution of illicit drug producers and distributors in such a manner that zero complaints were received from clients of court cases lost because of lack of results. The results of 106,360 exhibits analyzed were returned to the clients within an average of 33 days (DAS service standard is 60 days).

DAS contributed to increased safety in dismantling illicit drug operations by its involvement in 34 clandestine laboratories cases, including the dismantlement of 21 of them. DAS also provided training to law enforcement officers and first respondents by delivering 44 training sessions to 916 participants. The extent to which operations have been safely dismantled was assessed by tracking the number and nature of injuries and/or environmental risk caused by unsafe handling of chemicals. No injury was reported in 2012-13 for clandestine laboratories where DAS provided assistance and no incident associated with dismantlement that would have had an environmental impact was reported to DAS.

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.4 Health and Health Services Advances Research on Drug Treatment Models

(Treatment Action Plan)
$4.9M $1.0M $1.0M Link 1 Link 1
Total $4.9M $1.0M $1.0M    

Note: Amounts exclude Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1

Continue to improve the state of knowledge and its translation with respect to treatment and understanding of the consequences of illicit drug use.

To address this, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is continuing in 2012-13 the funding of three five-year team grants awarded in 2008-09 with the objectives to:

  • Generate high-quality research that addresses an important health and disease, health care or health system problem or issue which is best approached through a collaborative team;
  • Provide superior research training and mentorship environments; and
  • Produce new knowledge and the translation of research findings into improvements in the health of Canadians and the Canadian health care system.

CIHR will be launching a new Catalyst competition in 2012-13 as the first step in the development of a Canadian Intervention Research Network in Addiction in the following years of National Anti-Drug Strategy funding. The objectives are to:

  • Facilitate team formation, as a first step towards the pursuit of more comprehensive funding opportunities by researchers and addiction treatment providers and to generate preliminary observations, data or knowledge demonstrating integrated approaches to research; and
  • Generate high impact results and/or innovative research proposals, research tools, techniques, devices, inventions, or methodologies.

A third workshop for CIHR activities under the National Anti-Drug Strategy will be held in the fall of 2012. CIHR will be inviting the team grants to present their ongoing work, as well as the grantees from the current and previous catalyst and knowledge synthesis grants. The objectives of the workshop are to:

  • Share current knowledge and research results;
  • Establish networking of researchers and partners (federal departments, provincial agencies, non-governmental organizations ); and
  • Identify knowledge translation opportunities and provide feedback to CIHR .

Following this workshop, CIHR will be preparing a report highlighting the activities of CIHR during the first five years of National Anti-Drug Strategy funding.

Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

In 2012-13, CIHR continued to improve the state of knowledge and its translation with respect to treatment and understanding of the consequences of illicit drug use.

CIHR continued to fund the three team grants whose specific objectives are to study:

  • Driving while impaired by alcohol and other drugs (onset, persistence, prevention and treatment);
  • Non-medical use of prescription opioid analgesics in Canada; and
  • Process of implementation of a program of addiction/mental health intervention into primary health care settings.

While a few recipients of catalyst grants received extensions for their final reports (into 2013-14) for various reasons, CIHR received final reports for Catalyst grants funded in 2011-12.

CIHR has developed the operational plan and the initial funding opportunity for a national research consortium in substance misuse research - renamed the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM). The operational plan and launch of the funding opportunities was approved by the CIHR senior management committees. The first funding opportunity will be launched in July 2013.

CIHR held a third workshop in January 2013 and invited the current grantees (team grants and Catalyst grants) as well as past grantees, other researchers in addiction, representatives from the federal and provincial governments, non-governmental organizations, service providers and the director of the Clinical Trial Network of the American National Institute of Drug Addiction. The objectives of the workshop were to:

  • Share current knowledge and research results;
  • Establish networking of researchers and partners; and
  • Identify knowledge translation opportunities and provide feedback to CIHR on the development of future funding opportunities.

The CIHR has delayed the completion of the report highlighting the activities of CIHR during the first five years of NADS funding to 2013-14 since it is still expecting final reports. In addition, bibliometric data for addiction research from 1997 to 2011 was commissioned and completed in 2012-13 and will be analyzed and published in 2013-14. This bibliometric report will be used for establishment of baselines in the evaluation of the CRISM.

Federal Partner: Department of Public Safety

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
3. Law Enforcement a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$3.9M
($0.78M Ongoing)
$0.8M $0.4M Link 1 Link 1
5. Internal Services $0.1M $0.0M $0.0M Link 2 Link 2
Total $4.0M $0.8M $0.4M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1
  • Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.
Link 2
  • Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.
Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

In 2012-13, Public Safety (PS) indirectly contributed to increased capacity for drug enforcement and prosecution of illicit drug producers and distributors through the coordination of the Enforcement Working Group, and participation in both the Synthetic Drug Initiative Working Group and the National Council Against Marihuana Grow Operations and Clandestine Labs. PS worked with the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse and co-led the development of the Enforcement pillar of its strategy, First Do No Harm: Responding to Canada's Prescription Drug Crisis. Working with the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP), PS developed a resolution on a national Prescription Drop-off Day, which was adopted at CACP's Annual General Meeting. Further responding to the problem of prescription drugs in Canada, PS hosted a workshop for law enforcement in October 2012 on how to hold a drop-off day, and also developed a Handbook on Prescription Drug Return Initiatives along with a complementary Sharepoint site. PS has also advanced research on drug issues, including reviewing public safety research reports pertaining to supervised injection sites.

Through the coordination of the Enforcement Working Group led by PS, Strategy partners have had an opportunity to share concerns and updates on activities to increase knowledge among partners, which enhances efforts to reduce the supply of illicit drugs. In addition, PS provided input and participated in domestic and international fora, including the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND), the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) as well as other bilateral meetings related to common security issues (e.g., Canada-United States). At the 56th Session of the CND in March 2013, PS led the negotiations of a resolution entitled "Promoting initiatives for the safe, secure and appropriate return for disposal of prescription drugs, in particular those containing narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances under international control".

Link 2
  • Supported the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
A.1.2.A a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services

(Prevention Action Plan)
$14.5M $2.9M $1.7M Link 1 Link 1
A.1.1.3 Community and Youth Programs b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)
$0.0M $0.0M $0.0M Link 2 Link 2
A.1.2.1 c. Marihuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$112.5M $22.5M $17.3M Link 3 Link 3
Total $127.0M $25.4M $19.0M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) premiums and exclude Accommodation premiums of $0.5M ongoing

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1
  • Increase awareness of the impact drugs and organized crime have on communities and individuals by leveraging media outlets and public events to strengthen our messaging and reaching a broader base.
  • Enhance our organizational ability to provide first class prevention and awareness programs, by ensuring our training cadre possess the requisite level of facilitation and communication skills.
Link 2
  • Sun setting Item in 2011-12.
Link 3
  • Expanded international and national cooperation toward greater collaboration in conducting joint investigations with a particular focus on disrupting organized crime networks.
  • Greater engagement of government and non-government stakeholders, including community groups, in combating and reducing the impact of clandestine labs.
  • Enhanced ability to detect and investigate clandestine labs through increased training of Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) employees.
Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

In 2012-13, Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS) gave 3,461 awareness presentations reaching 37,667 youths; 27,686 parents; and 8,612 professionals. DOCAS also trained 150 facilitators for programs such as Drug Abuse Resistance Education, Aboriginal Shield Program, Racing Against Drugs, Kids & Drugs, and Drug Endangered Children. The majority of DOCAS' efforts and programs target school-age youth while informing and educating parents, community members, key stakeholders, as well as internal and external RCMP partners through presentations, consultative groups, partnerships and initiatives. DOCAS teaches youth to influence adults and vice versa. DOCAS educates the public about drugs and organized crime and their negative consequences. DOCAS provides the public with information, tools and skills on how to recognize and avoid bad situations in order to make healthy decisions.

DOCAS delivered a range of initiatives aimed at raising the awareness of illicit drugs and their negative consequences. These initiatives target youth and are constantly updated to ensure accurate drug information as the drug market changes rapidly (e.g., types of drugs available, popularity with youth, consequences of use, etc.) and to ensure the information is geographically and culturally appropriate.

The most significant programs being delivered include (but are not limited to):

  • Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) is a comprehensive drug education/prevention program designed to equip students from kindergarten to grade 12 with the skills to recognize and resist pressures of experimenting with drugs, among other risky behaviours (each D.A.R.E. class consists of 10 lessons). In 2012-13, the program was delivered in 90% of the school districts, to nearly 20,000 students in British Columbia alone. The program is active in most provinces and territories. Students attending the lessons completed a pre/post test which tests the knowledge transfer prior to the curriculum and after the candidates complete the curriculum. The results of the knowledge transfer tests are unknown at this point, as the data has not been collated.
  • Aboriginal Shield Program (ASP) was created to enable Aboriginal youth to make informed healthy lifestyle choices regarding alcohol, drugs and youth gangs, and proposes positive alternatives to destructive lifestyle choices. The program consists of two multi-lesson instructional manuals intended for youth in grades 5-6 and 7-8. Students attending the lessons complete pre/post tests. Results of a random sampling of the pre/post tests indicated an increase of knowledge of 13% in 2012-13.
  • Racing Against Drugs (RAD) is a program designed to promote healthy, drug-free lifestyles aimed at youth in grades 5-6. This is a key target age as these youth are nearing the age of early onset of drug use. The Simcoe-Muskoka District Health Unit (Ontario) has purchased its own equipment and now mirrors this initiative with its own Respect, Action, Courage, Excellence (R.A.C.E) Against Drugs program. The work-to-rule within the Ontario schools also impacted the overall numbers for 2012-13, with a number of schools being unable to participate. However, nationally, DOCAS mobilized several communities in preparing and delivering the Racing Against Drugs (RAD) program. In 2012-13, through RAD, several key messages relating to health and well-being, including a Drug Awareness and an Organized Crime (Youth Gangs) Awareness presentation, were delivered to over 13,044 youths, aged 10 to 12 years old, from 334 schools.
  • Kids and Drugs (K&D) is an education prevention program aimed at parents of school-aged children. It is designed to educate and assist parents who are concerned about preventing their children from using drugs. In 2012-13, DOCAS members delivered the program to 82 parents and trained 66 community and police members who are now certified to deliver the K&D program in their respective communities. A modified version of K&D is being presented to female inmates at an Ontario provincial institution, which is giving these women some parenting tools and enabling them to better understand how their behaviours are negatively impacting their children. This program has not been in place long enough for there to be any indication of its longer term results.
  • Drug Endangered Children (DEC) is an early intervention initiative, which seeks to stop the cycle of child abuse caused by the exposure to drug activity. In Ontario, 29 community partners were trained, which was driven by the DOCAS member in the greater Toronto area. The Ontario Association of the Chiefs of Police (OACP) approved a new DEC checklist for use by all OACP member agencies and any new police officers receiving DEC training at the Ontario Police College. The area of Grey-Bruce in Ontario has established a DEC Working Group, which is part of the Grey-Bruce Crystal Meth and Other Drugs Task Force. In 2012-13, they established a DEC protocol, which outlines in detail the community response to drug activity in homes with children. There is further training planned for other areas in Ontario to expand the DEC program beyond the greater Toronto area.
Link 2

Item sunsetted in 2011-12.

Link 3
Clandestine Labs and Synthetic Drugs

In 2012-13, the RCMP continued its progress on initiatives that were identified through joint collaboration with Government partners under the National Anti-Drug Strategy.

The intelligence sharing process in place continues to demonstrate success. The intelligence flow is ongoing between the RCMP, law enforcement agencies and other relevant partners.

Despite the continued high demand for and availability of MDMA (Ecstasy) and methamphetamine, other types of synthetic drugs (both regulated and unregulated) continued to resurface and emerge in the Canadian illicit drugs market. This is due in part to the ability of organized crime groups to diversify drug commodities in response to demand and law enforcement measures. New psychoactive substances (e.g., synthetic cannabinoids, piperazines, cathinones and amphetamine analogues) were increasingly being imported by organized crime groups to keep up with the demand for recreational drug use and to circumvent legislation. The availability of these substances, especially over the Internet, has radically changed the nature of the illicit drugs market.

In 2012, the RCMP responded with ramped up efforts to work more closely with the chemical industry to provide training across Canada to chemical distribution companies on diversion tactics. Within the RCMP Chemical Diversion Program, members established an "alert-bulletin" system for a series of unregulated essential chemicals that had been sought after by organized crime for the production of synthetic drugs. Many tips were received allowing investigators to establish new investigations that lead to the identification of new targets involved in the illicit synthetic drug trade.

In 2012-13, 22 clandestine labs were seized by the RCMP: 14 for the production of Methamphetamine, 2 for MDMA, 2 for DMT, 2 for Marihuana resin extraction, 1 for Red Phosphorus extraction and 1 for the production of steroids. The number of labs represents labs which were dismantled by the respective provincial Clandestine Lab Enforcement Response Teams (CLEAR units).

Marihuana Grow Operations

In 2011, the RCMP launched the Marihuana Grow Initiative (MGI) as an enhanced strategy to combat marijuana grow operations (MGOs). The Annual Report on the MGI, a public document which chronicles the achievements of the RCMP in advancing the MGI over the course of the past year, was published (http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/drugs-drogues/mgi-ircm/2012/report-rapport-eng.pdf). The multi-faceted MGI is based on three components: Enforcement, Deterrence, and Awareness. It represents the first national framework to guide the RCMP towards a more effective way to reduce MGOs in Canadian communities and includes the following highlights:

  • The MGI website where the RCMP publicizes addresses of locations where, under the authority of a search warrant, it has dismantled illegal MGOs or clandestine drug labs.
  • Town Hall meetings with community members, looking for solutions to the illegal MGO problem.
  • The RCMP has partnered with organizations such as the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA), the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals (CAAMP) to name a few.
  • The RCMP facilitated the creation of the National Council Against Marihuana Grow Operations and Clandestine Laboratories – a coalition of community, industry and government groups that will share best practices on increasing public awareness about the societal hazards of marijuana grow operations and clandestine labs, and advocate for a national approach aimed at helping prevent, detect, and deter such criminal acts.

In May 2012, the RCMP and the Thoi Bao National Media Outlet collaborated to publish a 12-part news series on MGOs and how they affect Canadians, particularly the Vietnamese communities across Canada. In support of this awareness activity, "O" Division, in collaboration with Drug Branch and DOCAS, hosted a Town Hall Meeting on MGOs with the Vietnamese Community in the Greater Toronto Area. The initiative was extremely well received and supported by the community who showed a genuine interest in finding solutions to the MGO problem affecting a small number of their members. The event was covered by the Vietnamese Broadcasting Network based in California.

The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) has been working with RCMP Drug Program Coordinator, within the new Federal Coordination Centre (FCC), to produce an awareness and guideline manual in relation to MGO and clandestine labs. This manual will be made available to real estate agents across Canada.

Since 1989, the RCMP has been conducting an annual joint forces operation with the Canadian Armed Forces, known as Operation SABOT (Ops SABOT). Ops SABOT is a yearly detection and eradication operation targeting outdoor marijuana grow operations during the late summer/early fall period. With the assistance of Canadian Armed Forces, RCMP investigators deploy helicopters and crews, across Canada in order to locate and dismantle outdoor marijuana plantations. In 2012-13, Ops SABOT netted 63,497 marijuana plants nationally. In 2012-13, Ops SABOT was re-introduced to Alberta and Manitoba for the first time in four years.

Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
2.0 Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders

(Mandatory Minimum Penalties)
$30.5M $6.1M $0.8M Link 1 Link 1
Total $30.5M $6.1M $0.8M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) premiums and exclude Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1

Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community.

Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

Bill C-10, the Safe Streets and Communities Act, received Royal Assent on March 13, 2012 and the sections of the Act which apply to Mandatory Minimum Penalties for Serious Drug Offences came into force November 6, 2012. The funding was held in a frozen allotment and at year end, an amount of $773,937 excluding EBP premiums and Accommodation premiums was released to cover the cost between August 9, 2012 and March 31, 2013 related to case preparation services in support of conditional release.

Federal Partner: Parole Board of Canada

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions

(Mandatory Minimum Penalties)
$5.6M $1.1M $0.5M Link 1 Link 1
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

(Mandatory Minimum Penalties)
$2.1M $0.5M $0.2M Link 2 Link 2
Internal Services $1.7M $0.3M $0.1M Support Programs N/A
Total $9.4M $1.9M $0.8M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums. The amounts also include the reductions following the 2008 Strategic Review and the 2011 Departmental Reduction Action Plan.

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1

This funding will provide the Parole Board of Canada (PBC) the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated a as result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

Link 2

This funding will provide the PBC the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. In a similar manner, PBC will report on the extent of involvement of victims, and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC.

Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

When Bill C-10, the Safe Streets and Communities Act, received Royal Assent on March 13, 2012, funding became available to strengthen the capacity of the PBC to effectively manage its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC collects information and reports on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole). Only a portion of the resources were needed in the first year to align and prepare the PBC so that it would be able to handle future increases in the number of reviews that will result from this change in legislation.

Link 2

When Bill C-10, the Safe Streets and Communities Act, received Royal Assent on March 13, 2012, funding became available to strengthen the capacity of the PBC to provide information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to the decision registry as a result of offenders sentenced under the provisions of the new legislation. In a similar manner, PBC reports on the extent of involvement of victims, and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC. Only a portion of the resources were needed in the first year to align and prepare the PBC so that it would be able to handle the future increases in the number of reviews that will result from this change in legislation.

Effective management of both these responsibilities contributes to public safety and reinforces public confidence in the justice system.

Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.1 Drug, Criminal Code, and terrorism prosecution program a. Prosecution and prosecution-related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$17.0M $3.4M $17.7M Link 1 Link 1
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Mandatory Minimum Penalties)
$36.2M [3] To be determined [3] $0.2M Link 2 Link 2
2.1 Internal Services Enforcement Action Plan $2.5M $0.5M $2.2M Support Programs  
Mandatory Minimum Penalties $5.3M [3] To be determined [3] $0.0M
Total $61.0M $3.9M $20.1M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

Link 2

Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the Mandatory Minimum Penalties (MMPs).

Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

In 2012-13, the ODPP handled 26,810 litigation files dealing with drug production and distribution offences, pursuant to CDSA sections 5(1), 5(2), 6(1), 6(2), 7(1), 7(2) and 7.1. Files are handled by staff prosecutors and Crown agents. These include new files opened in 2012-13 (12,153) as well as files carried over from previous fiscal years against which time has been recorded (14,657). Of these, 22,157 included distribution offences, whereas 996 included production offences. An additional 3,143 files included both production and distribution offences. The remaining 514 files are CDSA-related but have not yet been updated to indicate which charge applies. Actual spending reflects incremental in-house prosecution costs only since agent costs fall under the Drug Prosecution Fund. The increase in actual spending is mainly due to the higher proportion of hours spent on files carried over from previous fiscal years that came before the courts in 2012-13 (200,749 hours or 82% of overall time recorded) as well as a high proportion of moderate and high-complexity files. This includes 621 files that include organized crime components. Also, the ODPP has recently made improvements to correct data extraction methodologies, which has resulted in the capture of a greater amount of relevant cost data more accurately. Also, it should be noted that most National Anti-Drug Strategy files include charges other than those related to serious drug offences under the CDSA – mainly Criminal Code charges. As a result, the time entered on such files will constitute an overestimation of actual National Anti-Drug Strategy-related activity. Since time recorded against litigation files is not initiative or charge-specific, it is not possible to specifically attribute an exact number of hours to specific charges.

Link 2

In 2012-13, the ODPP handled 160 National Anti-Drugs Strategy-related files involving MMPs, dedicating 1,204 hours to handle these files. Since MMPs under the CDSA only came into effect in November 2012, there have been few files with charges that attract an MMP.

Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Risk Assessment Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$9.9M $1.6M $2.1M Link 1 Link 1
Admissibility Determination   $0.4M $0.4M
Internal Services $8.1M $1.6M $1.5M Link 2 Link 2
Total $18.0M $3.6M $4.0M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1
  • Increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.
  • Increase intelligence support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the Strategy.
  • Improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting and information sharing related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.
Link 2

Laboratory and Scientific Services - continuation of the original Strategy plan with respect to additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry. Safe sampling tools are still in development.

Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) continued to assist in the development of training for frontline officers in the identification, targeting, and safe sampling of precursor chemicals. This has resulted in more effective targeting and an increase in the rates of examination, resulting in higher interdiction rates and subsequently more data for analysis and intelligence development.

The CBSA continued to provide Intelligence Officers with assistance in knowing exactly who to contact when they needed to acquire or share information regarding precursor chemicals. The constant flow of communication within the CBSA and between partners continued to assist in the identification of entities involved in the illicit trade and helped provide a national and international snapshot of which organized crime groups operate in which region and in what chemicals.

The NADS continued to contribute to a stronger relationship between the CBSA, RCMP and international customs organizations by facilitating the flow of communication through the formal Precursor Chemical Intelligence Network. This network continues to improve intelligence development for all parties, resulting in better identification of entities involved in the criminal importation and export of precursor chemicals and synthetic drugs, which continues to lead to higher rates of interdiction, arrests, prosecutions, and the eventual disruption of organized operations.

The CBSA continues to significantly contribute to the Enforcement Action Plan of the National Anti-Drug Strategy, along with its partners. These concerted efforts result in shared knowledge, a dependable network for information, collaboration and cooperation, and intelligence development. CBSA Intelligence continues to contribute to the Precursors Incident Communication System (PICS) by reporting seizures and stopped shipments and equipment intercepted at Ports of Entry. This is an on-line secure tool for enhanced communication and information sharing between national authorities on precursory incidents (seizures, stopped shipments, diversions and diversion attempts, illicit laboratories and associated equipment) worldwide and real-time and is a valuable asset to police and customs organizations in initiating international investigations.

The CBSA actively participated in Joint Forces Operations with law enforcement partners across the Regions.

Link 2

The CBSA continues to see increases in sample requests for suspected contraband products, including precursor chemicals.

The lab has been involved in the analysis and identification of a wide variety of precursor chemicals including: GBL, ephedrine/pseudoephedrine, ketamine precursor, fentanyl precursor, hypophosphorous acid, potassium permanganate, safrole, 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene (uncontrolled precursor for amphetamine and methamphetamine).

Over the last year, the CBSA laboratory has noticed a decrease in the number of "bath salts" samples containing Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and an increase the number of samples containing alpha-PVP following the addition of MDPV to controlled substance list. The lab also noticed a new form for smuggling ephedrine (ephedrine mixed with glucose and flavouring materials).

The CBSA laboratory continues to provide information related to precursors and designer substances to partners within the National Anti-Drug Strategy in a timely fashion.

The mobile laboratory was deployed and used to successfully identify a wide variety of substances including: opium, heroin, MDPV, synthetic cannabinoids and anabolic steroids.

Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD)

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.5M $0.9M $0.9M Link 1

Link 2
Link 1

Link 2
Total $4.5M $0.9M $0.9M    

Note: Amounts exclude Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1
  • Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in their fight against illicit drugs and international crime at the global level.
Link 2
  • Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against illicit drugs in the Americas.
Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

No Funds have been approved for UNODC for 2012-13.

Link 2

Provided financial contributions to the OAS Inter-American Commission Against Drug Abuse (CICAD) in fulfilling its mandate through activities in support of the Enforcement Action Plan, including: creating Drug Information Networks (DINs) to collect and analyze data on illicit drugs for the development of effective anti-drug policies and practices in the Caribbean and Central America; gathering, analyzing and reporting information on drugs; improving the control of chemical diversion for the production of illicit drugs; and increasing the investigative and operational counter-drug capacities of OAS Member States.

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
4. Reporting Compliance Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$5.0M $1.0M $1.0M Link 1 Link 1
Total $5.0M $1.0M $1.0M    

Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) and Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1
  • 25 audits of taxpayers involved in production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re)assessments of $3,000,000 of federal taxes.
  • Leads for audits will result from referrals from the RCMP and other law enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities of illegal drug use, production and distribution.
  • Emphasis will be placed on intelligence-led, strategic file selection in an effort to reduce the profitability of illegal / criminal activities in this sector.
Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

26 audits completed consisting of seven audits with adjustments under both the Income Tax Act and the Excise Tax Act (GST/HST), and 19 audits with adjustments under the Income Tax Act.

The results from the above noted compliance actions were as follows:

  • Total Unreported Income reassessed of $9,847,989;
  • Total Federal Taxes reassessed of $3,168,550; and,
  • Total GST/HST reassessed of $519,183.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$2.2M $0.6M $0.6M Link 1 Link 1
Total $2.2M $0.6M $0.6M    

Note: Amounts exclude Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) premiums and include Accommodation premiums

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1
  • Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.
Results Achieved in 2012-13
Link 1

The Forensic Accounting Management Group provided three forensic accountants, who continued to increase the overall operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Federal Partner: Financial Transactions and Analysis Centre of Canada

Federal Partner PAA Programs Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2012-13
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Financial Intelligence Program (P139-0002) Financial Intelligence Program (P139-0002)

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$0.0M $0.0M $0.7M Link 1 Link 1
Total $0.0M $0.0M $0.7M    
Expected Results for 2012-13:
Link 1

2012-13 begins the period for which FINTRAC becomes an unfunded partner within the National Anti-Drug Strategy. However, given the importance of Strategy, FINTRAC has internally reallocated resources to continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions. This intelligence will be produced as FINTRAC will continue to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of our partners.

Results Achieved 2011–12:
Link 1

In 2012-13, FINTRAC disclosed a total of 919 cases to law enforcement, including 248 unique cases that related to at least one drug-related offence, a modest increase from the 209 unique drug-related disclosures made in 2011-12. A breakdown between distribution and production of various types of drugs is provided in the following table (please note that the total does not equal 248 as one case can be related to multiple drug offences):

Drug-Related Disclosures Number of Cases
Distribution/Trafficking - Cocaine 74
Distribution/Trafficking - Hashish or Hash Oil 4
Distribution/Trafficking - Heroin 7
Distribution/Trafficking - Marihuana 44
Distribution/Trafficking - Opium 2
Distribution/Trafficking - Prescription Drugs 14
Distribution/Trafficking - Synthetic Drugs 10
Distribution/Trafficking - Khat 1
Distribution/Trafficking - Unspecified 99
Production - Cocaine 1
Production - Marihuana 31
Production - Synthetic Drugs 7
Production - Unspecified 4

It is important to note that the predicate offences (drug-related) were determined through a manual review of FINTRAC disclosures and that some cases were not identified as drug-related where there was insufficient context provided by investigators or reports to enable the determination of the predicate offence.

In 2012-13, over 27% of FINTRAC case disclosures relate to suspicions of money laundering or terrorist financing where the predicate offence is believed to be drug distribution or production.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-2013 Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
$515.9M $106.6M $110.7M
Comments on Variances:

Health Canada

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)

The DSCIF receives $9.6M annually and not $11.5M (as stated in the 2012-13 RPP).

Actual spending is slightly higher than Planned Spending as a result of additional programming undertaken related to the project "Improving Drug Prevention for Canada's Youth".

Drug Treatment Funding Program DTFP

Additional investments were made to support activities in DTFP related to the project "Promoting Evidence-Based System Development" to enhance knowledge exchange activities, increase stakeholder engagement and strengthen the evidence base for the addiction treatment field in Canada.

National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

The variance is explained due to an increase in expenditures related to Mental Wellness Teams Pilot Projects. Mental wellness teams are community-based, multi-disciplinary teams comprised of clinical and cultural experts to provide ongoing support to a cluster of communities.

Office of Controlled Substances

The variance is due to less than anticipated expenditures on reimbursement to law enforcement for destruction costs of seized controlled substances in 2012-13.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

As noted in Chapter 5 of the June 2011 Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the RCMP has had to reallocate funding internally from all programs in order to meet the increased demands for National Policing Services. Furthermore, various Federal and Protective policing priorities have created additional requirements to reallocate funding and resources.

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Jennifer Goldstone
A/Head, National Anti-Drug Strategy
Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section
(613) 948-7410
Jennifer.Goldstone@justice.gc.ca


  • [1] The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched in 2007 and the total allocation for all federal partners from 2007-08 to 2011-12 was $578.6M. Fiscal year 2012-13 is the start date of the current reporting cycle that covers 2012-13 to 2016-17.
  • [2] The amount for the 2012-13 planned spending and the total allocation might not add up due to rounding.
  • [3] Funding to implement Mandatory Minimum Penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences was approved on September 27, 2007 and held in a frozen allotment contingent to Bill C-10 receiving Royal Assent, which happened on March 13, 2012. The departments/agencies involved in responding to the impact of Mandatory Minimum Penalties for serious drug offences were then able to access these funds.
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