2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Supplementary Information Tables

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

TPPs exceed $5 million during the reporting year

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2003

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Support Fund is designed to facilitate access to justice in both official languages through various means, including the creation of legal and linguistic tools, workshops and training to bilingual lawyers and stakeholders of the justice system, the development of related training material and provision of public legal education and information. Its objectives are to increase the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer justice services in both official languages and to increase awareness in the legal community and official language minority and majority communities concerning their rights and issues related to access to justice in both official languages.

Recipients:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations;
  • Provincial and territorial governments, regional and municipal governments, provincial and territorial Crown corporations;
  • Canadian institutions/boards of education, including Centre for jurilinguistics.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

The Department continued to work with its partners to improve access to justice in both official languages. Funding was directed to projects aiming:

  • To increase awareness among Canadians and the legal profession about issues relating to official languages in official language minority communities; and
  • To improve the capacity of justice stakeholders to offer services in both official languages. 

The Department reviewed 38 new funding proposals and funded 42 projects in 2014-2015 (including multi-year projects approved in 2013-14).

  • Thirteen projects funded under the Justice Training in Both Official Languages Component supported training for 630 justice professionals (including provincially appointed judges, provincial crown attorneys, probation officers, and clerks) to improve their capacity to delivery services in both official languages.  Seven of these projects provided specialized language training programs to fifty-six provincial court judges from twelve jurisdictions.
  • Twenty projects aimed to raise awareness and support public legal information activities to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages. For example, a project by Éducaloi aimed to provide legal and language rights information to the Anglophone community, while five other projects supported the establishment of Justice Hub Centres managed by provincial French-speaking jurists associations.
  • Two projects contributed to the development of a curriculum for bilingual students interested in pursuing a career in the field of justice.
  • One project aimed to promote increased recruitment in justice-related careers. 
  • Six projects focused on developing linguistic training tools, including the Jurisource.ca portal which provides legal and juri-linguistic resources to justice professionals working with official language minority communities.

The Support Fund also supports the work of web portals such as cliquezjustice.ca and Éducaloi.qc.ca which provide legal information to official language minority communities across the country in the official language of their choice.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $42,880 $49,466 $600,000 $266,883 $139,070 $460,930
Total contributions $6,743,233 $4,231,006 $5,892,845 $6,225,962 $6,225,962 -$333,117
Total Program $6,786,113 $4,280,472 $6,492,845 $6,492,845 $6,365,032 $127,813

Comments on variances:

The Department works diligently with applicants to ensure that proposals meet the objectives and priorities of the Support Fund. In 2014-2015, some projects proposals required a more in-depth review which resulted in not being implemented in 2014–2015, in addition, some projects were amended to meet departmental needs which resulted in a lower funding allocation.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The Evaluation of the Initiative in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages was completed in fiscal year 2012-2013 and is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/12/bole-edlo/index.html (and in French at http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/12/edlo-bole/index.html.) The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 2017-2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Throughout the year, the Department actively engaged its network of stakeholders from official language minority communities through different channels such as conference calls, online newsletters and in-person meetings of its Advisory Committee on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages (March 2015) and the FPT Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages (November 2014).

The consultation process was useful in obtaining feedback from funding recipient organizations and provincial and territorial governments on the implementation of the Support Fund’s strategy. This engagement was also instrumental in identifying significant issues in access to justice in both official languages. In-person meetings were an effective forum for sharing relevant information and best practices with and among stakeholders.

Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 1991 as Aboriginal Justice Initiative, renewed as Aboriginal Justice Strategy in 1996, 2002, 2007, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) enables Aboriginal communities to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice and supports Aboriginal community-based programs that offer alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. AJS programs are also aimed at reducing the rates of victimization, crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs as well as helping the mainstream justice system become more responsive and sensitive to the needs and culture of Aboriginal communities.

Recipients: (a) First Nations, Bands, Tribal Councils, local, regional and national Aboriginal organizations; (b) regional/municipal governments including their agencies and institutions; (c) non-profit community organizations, societies, and associations which have voluntarily associated themselves for a non-profit purpose; (d) provincial and territorial governments; (e) individuals; and (f) for-profit corporations, so long as these corporations will not make a profit on the work performed.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

The Department announced an additional $11.1 million for the AJS for fiscal year 2016-17. This funding will support approximately 275 community-based programs that serve more than 800 urban, rural, and Northern communities, both on- and off-reserve and is in addition to the $22.2 million over two-years for the AJS announced in the Economic Action Plan 2014.

The AJS launched its Capacity-Building Fund call for proposals earlier than in previous years using an online application form. As a result, projects were approved earlier in the fiscal year, thereby giving recipients more time to carry out their activities. This funding focused on emerging policy issues and resulted in support for several capacity-building projects aiming to reduce violence against Aboriginal women and girls. In total, over $1 million in AJS funding supported thirty capacity-building projects. The AJS also revised its data-collection procedures and community-based programs began collecting data using the revised procedures to ensure that consistent national data is collected.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $50,000 $50,000 $0 $50,000 $50,000 -$50,000
Total contributions $12,430,517 $12,443,549 $2,900,000 $12,551,752 $12,551,752 -$9,651,752
Total Program $12,480,517 $12,493,549 $2,900,000 $12,601,752 $12,601,752 -$9,701,752

Comments on variances:

Budget 2014 confirmed the renewal of AJS funding (2014-16). An earlier launch of the Capacity-Building Fund call for proposals allowed the AJS to expend the majority of its allocated grant funding in 2014- 2015

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The last evaluation of the AJS was completed in November 2011. It is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/11/ajs-sja/index.html (and in French at http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/11/sja-ajs/index.html). The next planned evaluation of the AJS is scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Applicants and recipients were engaged through ongoing interactions with Justice Canada officials relating to funding, reporting and sharing of information. The AJS Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group held regular teleconferences throughout the year and met in-person in May. The Working Group serves as forum for discussing the AJS as well as cross-jurisdictional issues.

Legal Aid Systems

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Legal Aid Systems (Voted)

Start date:

August 17, 1971

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The objective of the federal Legal Aid Program is to contribute to sustaining a national system of justice to help ensure that economically disadvantaged persons have access to the justice system. Contribution funding is provided to the provinces to support the delivery of legal aid in criminal, youth criminal justice and immigration and refugee matters. (Funding for criminal and civil legal aid in the territories is provided through the Access to Justice Services Agreements).

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

Provinces have an increased capacity to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $119,827,507 $120,327,507 $108,827,507 $120,327,507 $120,327,507 -$11,500,000
Total Program $119,827,507 $120,327,507 $108,827,507 $120,327,507 $120,327,507 -$11,500,000

Comments on variances:

Budget 2014 confirmed the renewal of $11,500,000 for immigration and refugee legal aid

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The most recent evaluation final report was completed in January 2012, and is available on the Justice Canada website at: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/rep-rap/12/lap-paj/index.html (and in French at http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/12/paj-lap/index.html.) The next evaluation is scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Permanent Working Group on Legal Aid (PWG). The PWG was created as a forum for discussion and joint policy development in legal aid matters. The resulting collaboration promotes the development and implementation of legal aid policy and programs in Canada.

Youth Justice Services

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Youth Justice Services (Voted)

Start date:

April 2, 1984

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The federal Youth Justice Services Funding Program (YJSFP) is a cost-shared contribution program with all provinces and territories for the delivery of youth justice programs and services. Through YJSFP, the department provides contribution funding to the provinces and territories for programs and services aimed at youth in conflict with the law which encourage their accountability, rehabilitation and reintegration into the community; promote diversion from the formal court process where appropriate; and, reserve custody for the most serious offender.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

Through the Youth Justice Services Funding Program (YJSFP), provinces and territories have received financial support for providing a range of youth justice programs and services aimed at youth in conflict with the law which encourage their accountability, rehabilitation and reintegration into the community; promote diversion from the formal court process where appropriate; and, reserve custody for the most serious offender YJSFP funding agreements with all provinces and territories are in effect for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $177,302,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $0
Total Program $177,302,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $141,692,415 $0

Comments on variances:

N/A

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The most recent program evaluation was conducted in 2011, with the Evaluation of the Youth Justice Initiative Funding Components. The Action Plan that resulted from this Evaluation has since been fully implemented. A new evaluation, covering the 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 period, is currently underway.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Youth Justice Cost-sharing and Programs. 

Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Supporting Families Experiencing Seperation in Divorce Initiative (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2009

End date:

Funding expires March 31, 2017

Description:

The Supporting Families Fund is a key component of the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative (SFI), which was announced by the Minister of Justice in September 2008 and launched on April 1, 2009. The Fund is aimed at facilitating access to the family justice system for families experiencing separation and divorce through various services, programs, and information resources, particularly those that promote compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. The Fund also supports projects that promote public awareness about parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system.

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments, agencies, or other organizations designated by provincial and territorial governments as responsible for child support, the enforcement of support orders and agreements and parenting arrangement programs and services, are eligible to apply for contribution funding under the Family Justice Initiatives and the Pilot Projects components of the Fund.

Any of the following may apply for contribution or class grant funding under the Fund's Public Legal Education and Information and Professional Training component:

  • individuals
  • non-profit professional organizations, societies or associations
  • other non-profit organizations, societies or associations
  • educational institutions
  • private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects in partnership with federal, provincial, or territorial governments

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

The Family Justice Initiatives component of the Fund supported provincial and territorial family justice programs and services that assist families experiencing separation and divorce to deal with issues relating to child/spousal support; custody/access enforcement; and parenting arrangement, thus facilitating access to the family justice system.

Funding was also provided to provinces and territories under the Pilot Projects component to develop, implement and evaluate innovative family justice services with a focus on compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. Funded pilot projects in 2014-2015 included:

  • Virtual Justice Access Centre in BC
  • Creation of a Family Justice Triage Centre and Establishment of a Summary Family Court System in Manitoba
  • Child’s Wish Assessment in Nova Scotia
  • On-line Parent Education Program in Nova Scotia
  • Child Support Recalculation Service in Yukon
  • Family Law information for Youth in Saskatchewan

These pilot projects promoted accessibility of custody/access, support and enforcement services for separating and divorcing families and promoted knowledge of family law issues.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $50,000 $0 $0
Total contributions $15,996,002 $15,999,842 $0 $15,950,000 $15,827,448 -$15,827,448
Total Program $15,996,002 $15,999,842 $0 $16,000,000 $15,827,448 -$15,827,448

Comments on variances:

Budget 2014 confirmed the renewal of the $16,000,000 Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Fund

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The evaluation of the Supporting Families Initiative was completed in March 2014. The evaluation confirmed the value of federal activities including: family law information for Canadians, support enforcement activities and funding for the delivery of family justice services for separating and divorcing families. It found that the Initiative supported family justice services and projects that have facilitated access to the family justice system for separating and divorcing families and promoted parents’ compliance with their family law obligations.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

  • Continued to provide information to the applicants by posting funding information on the Justice Canada website and via telephone and e-mail;
  • Continued to obtain feedback from funding recipients to improve program funding process;
  • Continued to respond to questions from funding recipients via telephone, e-mail or face to face meetings regarding proposal development and throughout the funding process; and
  • Through the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO)-Family Justice Committee, continued to seek feedback and collaboration from provincial and territorial governments and recipients of family justice services funding on funding criteria, final reporting template and collection of program data for the purpose of the Impact evaluation of the SFI. The Committee serves as a forum for discussing the SFI as well as any cross-jurisdictional family justice issues that arise. During 2013–2014, discussions of the CCSO-Family Justice Committee included the renewal of the program.

Victims Fund

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Victims Fund (Voted)

Start date:

Victims of Crime Initiative (VCI) April 1, 2000, and Federal Victims Strategy (FVS) April 1, 2007

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Victims Fund is part of the Federal Victims Strategy that works to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice system. The Victims Fund provides grants and contributions to support projects and activities that encourage the development of new approaches, promote access to justice, improve the capacity of service providers, foster the establishment of referral networks, and/or increase awareness about the needs of victims of crime and services and legislation available to assist them.

Recipients: (a) individuals; (b) national, provincial, territorial, municipal, Aboriginal, community or professional organizations, societies or associations; (c) Canadian educational institutions/boards of education; (d) International governmental and non-governmental organizations, including bodies associated or affiliated with organizations of which Canada is a member, which have as their purpose victim advocacy, services, assistance or raising awareness about the impact of victimization; (e) private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects; (f) bands, tribal councils and self-governing First Nations who are working to provide services and assistance to victims of crime in Aboriginal communities; (g) provincial, territorial, municipal and regional governments and agencies.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

In 2014–2015, the Victims Fund provided funding for a total of $11.15M to:

  • 16 organizations to establish or enhance Child Advocacy Centres;
  • 8 organizations in support of concrete measures on missing and murdered Aboriginal women;
  • 8 organizations that provide direct services victims of human trafficking;
  • 9 organizations to help them maintain services by covering operating expenses;
  • 31 funded projects across Canada to deliver services to victims and/or raise awareness about victim issues;
  • 12 provinces and territories to support the development, enhancement and delivery of victim services;
  • 261 support of community events to mark National Victims of Crime Awareness Week;
  • 362 victims (including support persons) to attend Parole Board of Canada hearings;
  • 62 Canadians victimized abroad (including support persons); and
  • 1 individual for exceptional circumstances.
Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $2,220,982 $1,745,910 $3,250,000 $2,228,462 $1,870,918 $1,379,082
Total contributions $8,573,011 $8,929,669 $8,253,223 $9,274,761 $9,274,761 -$1,021,538
Total Program $10,793,993 $10,675,579 $11,503,223 $11,503,223 $11,145,679 $357,544

Comments on variances:

The Department pursued efforts to reach as many applicants as possible working diligently with applicants to ensure that funding proposals met the objectives and priorities of the Victims Fund. Past efforts have yielded positive results: provincial and territorial governments are accessing available resources; there is increased demand for funds for activities under the National Victims of Crime Awareness Week and for projects related to Child Advocacy Centers, human trafficking and families of missing or murdered Aboriginal women.;. The variance is attributed to a variety of factors, including the fact that many anticipated projects received during the fiscal year required in-depth review and, as a consequence, were not implemented in 2014–2015.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

A summative evaluation of the Federal Victims Strategy was completed in 2010.  It found that the Strategy is well aligned with Government of Canada priorities and that the Policy Centre for Victim Issues achieves high results at a low cost. The evaluation is available on the Justice Canada website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/cp-pm/eval/reprap/11/fvs-sfv/index.html (and in French at http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/pm-cp/eval/rap-rep/11/sfvfvs/index.html.)

The next evaluation of the Federal Victims Strategy is currently underway and is scheduled to be completed in 2015-2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

The Department continued its outreach efforts with applicants and recipients through various means including:

  • Providing information to potential applicants by posting funding information on the Department's website and via telephone and e-mail;
  • Responding to questions from funding applicants and recipients via telephone, e-mail or face to face meetings regarding proposal development and throughout the funding process;
  • Obtaining direct feedback from funding recipients through surveys to improve the program funding process;
  • Promoting the Victims Fund at meetings with stakeholders, criminal justice associations, and with criminal justice system partners;
  • Promoting the Victims Fund in Policy Centre for Victim Issues (PCVI) publications and newsletters; and,
  • Regular communication with the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Victims of Crime to engage key partners in meeting the objectives of the Federal Victims Strategy and the Victims Fund.

Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2002

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist the provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other sentencing options applicable under the Act to serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems. It is expected that these services might reduce the likelihood of further violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences.

Recipients: Provinces and territories.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

Through the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) Funding Program, provinces and territories were supported in providing a range of youth justice programs and services that target young persons in conflict with the law. Specifically for the IRCS Program, federal funding was provided towards specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) and other sentencing options applicable under the Act for serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems (exceptional cases). During 2014-15, a total of sixteen (16) IRCS orders were issued by the courts and became eligible for federal funding, bringing the total number of active IRCS cases funded to forty-eight (48). In addition, another nine (9) exceptional cases were approved for funding during 2014-15, bringing the total number of active exceptional cases to twelve (12). IRCS funding agreements with all provinces and territories are effective for the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $10,872,387 $10,770,273 $11,048,000 $11,048,000 $10,846,381 $201,619
Total Program $10,872,387 $10,770,273 $11,048,000 $11,048,000 $10,846,381 $201,619

Comments on variances:

Spending under this program largely depends on sentences imposed under section 42(r) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and applications for Other Exceptional Case funding and as such remains unpredictable. The IRCS program plans its budget, in part, based on a projected number of applications and orders from provincial and territorial governments. In 2014–15, the program received less applications and orders than were expected resulting in a variance (surplus).

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The most recent evaluation was conducted in 2011, with the Evaluation of the Youth Justice Initiative Funding Components. The Action Plan that resulted from this Evaluation has since been fully implemented. A new evaluation, covering the 2009-10 to 2013-14 period, is currently underway.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Recipients continue to be engaged through the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Youth Justice Cost-sharing and Programs.

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act (Voted)

Start date:

April 1, 2002

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Contraventions Act allows the federal government to designate federal statutory offences as contraventions so that they can be processed using a ticketing regime, thus reducing the burden on the court system, reducing the costs for the accused and the government, and limiting the impact of a conviction based on a federal offence. The Act authorizes the federal government to sign administration agreements with provinces, territories and municipalities allowing the federal government to use existing provincial penal regimes to prosecute federal contraventions. The Contraventions Act Fund provides funding to provinces, territories and municipalities that have signed administration agreements so that they can implement the Act in a manner consistent with the applicable constitutional language rights laws involving compliance with judicial services (section 530 and 530.1 of the Criminal Code) and extrajudicial services (Part IV of the Official Languages Act).

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments and agencies and municipalities designated by provincial and territorial governments as being responsible for judicial activities and for providing extrajudicial services in both official languages.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

Substantial progress was made in negotiations with Newfoundland and Labrador and Saskatchewan towards the conclusion of Contraventions Act Administration and Enforcement Agreements. These Agreements will include provisions for measures supported by the Contraventions Act Fund to ensure language rights are respected. Moreover, the status of the provincial ticket and forms in both official languages was confirmed, which are necessary in order to incorporate the Provincial Offences Act into the federal Application of Provincial Laws Regulations and the regulatory amending process is underway. There remains only the discussion towards the signing of an Administration and Enforcement Agreement, with provisions for measures guaranteeing language rights, for the Act to be implemented. Overall, the Contraventions Act is implemented in seven provinces. As a result, over 80% of Canadians reside in a province where persons who have received a federal contravention are guaranteed access to the justice system in the official language of their choice.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $5,040,634 $4,938,711 $9,094,900 $7,953,274 $3,810,821 $5,284,079
Total Program $5,040,634 $4,938,711 $9,094,900 $7,953,274 $3,810,821 $5,284,079

Comments on variances:

Only provinces/territories/municipalities are eligible for funding under the Fund. Justice Canada continues to work diligently towards having provinces/territories/municipalities sign Contraventions Act administration and enforcement agreements containing language rights provisions supported by the Fund. However, negotiations and progress depend largely on the priorities, and therefore capacity, of the provinces. Only when all jurisdictions will have signed agreements will the Fund be completely committed.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The next planned evaluation is scheduled to be completed in 2016-2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

The Sub-Working Group of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group – Contraventions Regime (Sub-Working Group) was created at a meeting of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in Both Official Languages in 2012. It brings together the Department’s provincial partners to identify and discuss emerging legal and operational issues and share information, with the goal of contributing to greater access to justice, including access to justice in both official languages through the efficient and effective administration and enforcement of federal contraventions. The inaugural meeting took place on April 8, 2014.

Aboriginal Courtwork Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Aboriginal Courtwork Program

Start date:

April 1, 1978

End date:

Ongoing

Description:

The Aboriginal Courtwork (ACW) Programprovides funding to provinces and territories for Aboriginal Courtworker services. The objective of the Program is to improve access to justice by helping Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. It is the only ongoing justice related program available to all Aboriginal people (adult and youth), regardless of status and residency. The ACW Program is limited to providing services in criminal proceedings only.

Briefly stated, Aboriginal Courtworkers serve multiple roles: 

  • acting as culturally relevant “navigators” for Aboriginal people in contact with the criminal justice system whether as accused persons, victims, witnesses and/or family members;
  • providing Courts with information needed for matters such as sentencing and bail purposes; and
  • connecting victims, witnesses and family members to culturally safe assistance and resources.  

Recipients: Federal contributions will be made to provincial governments to provide Aboriginal Courtwork services to Aboriginal persons (adults and youths) charged with an offence under any federal or provincial statute or municipal by-law. A province may authorize one or more agencies to deliver Aboriginal Courtwork services on its behalf. All designated delivery agencies are accountable to the funders. In addition, the Projects in Support of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program component provide modest support for projects that further the mandate of the Program.

Strategic Outcome(s):

A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system

Results Achieved:

Aboriginal Courtworkers provided services to over 59,411 Aboriginal clients in 435 communities in 2013-14. They continue to be seen as the ‘Go To’ resource by communities, court officials, local bars and the judiciary because of their direct impact on the efficiency of court proceedings, including contributing to reductions in administration of justice offences and recidivism.

In 2014-15 the ACW Program implemented new shared National Data Requirements (NDRs) across Canada. Several ACW Programs held jurisdictional training workshops and new forms, work plans, reporting templates and a guidebook were developed to support the implementation. The first year of data collected using the new metrics is expected in 2015-16. A Gladue E-Learning website was developed by the Tripartite Working Group on the ACW Program and is now available online at http://www.gladueprinciples.ca

In addition, 18 projects with provinces and territories and service delivery agencies were funded through the Projects in Support of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program Fund. The projects supported a diverse range of activities to support Aboriginal Courtworkers (training, data collection, and self-care) and six Regional Training sessions in support of the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act.

Program: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework
  2012–13 Actual spending 2013–14 Actual spending 2014–15 Planned spending 2014–15 Total authorities 2014–15 Actual spending Variance
Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $4,896,998 $5,155,570 $4,911,363 $5,568,507 $5,568,507 -$657,144
Total Program $4,896,898 $5,155,570 $4,911,363 $5,568,507 $5,568,507 -$657,144

Comments on variances:

This year’s variance is due to an internal re-allocation of resources to support 18 projects with provinces and territories and Aboriginal Courtwork Program service delivery agencies that included six regional training sessions in support of the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act.

Audits completed or planned:

N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

The next evaluation of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program will take place in 2016-17.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

The Annual meeting of the Tripartite Working Group on the ACW Program was held in Whitehorse, Yukon, June 3-4, 2014. The Annual Meetings of the Program Directors on the ACW Program and the FPT Working Group on the ACW Program were held at the same time. Tripartite Working Group teleconferences were in September and December 2014 and in April 2015. Ongoing engagement and outreach to applicants for the project fund and for recipients included regular emails, phone calls, video conferences, site visits and feedback on project applications, reporting and processes. 

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