2015–16 Departmental Performance Report
Supplementary Information Tables

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative

National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS)

Lead department(s)

Department of Justice Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

  • Health Canada;
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research;
  • Public Safety Canada;
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police;
  • Correctional Service Canada;
  • Parole Board of Canada;
  • Public Prosecution Service of Canada;
  • Canada Border Services Agency;
  • Global Affairs Canada;
  • Canada Revenue Agency;
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada; and
  • Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.

Non‑federal and non‑governmental partner(s)

not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

  • 2007-08 (First year of NADS)
  • First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12)
  • Second reporting cycle (2012-13 to 2016-17)

End date of the horizontal initiative

2016-17 and Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

  • First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12): $563.4 million
  • Second reporting period (2012-13 to 2016-17): $568.5 million

Funding contributed by non‑federal and non‑governmental partners

not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The NADS (NADS) was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Through the 2013 Speech from the Throne and Economic Action Plan 2014, the Government of Canada expanded the Strategy to include prescription drug abuse. The goal of the Strategy is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse, treat dependency, and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment, and enforcement.

The Prevention Action Plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs and abusing prescription drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects, and to develop and implement community-based interventions and initiatives. The Treatment Action Plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The Enforcement Action Plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared outcome(s)

  • Reduced prescription drug abuse in Canada;
  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced negative health and social impacts and crime related to illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance structures

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC) and Director General‑level working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The ADMSC, which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions and makes recommendations for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate. It also oversees the work of the four Director General‑level working groups.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans, as well as the work of a Prevention and Treatment Sub‑Working Group. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan, as well as the work of a new Sub-Committee on Information Sharing and Surveillance. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy, as well as the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy, which includes making the decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative to the public and stakeholder groups and ensuring coordination of such communications. It also oversees the work of a Communications Sub-Working Group.

Performance highlights

In 2015–16, the 13 federal partner departments and agencies involved in NADS continued their work to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependence, and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs, in addition to undertaking new work to address prescription drug abuse.

The tables below present the results for each federal partner’s program activities.

Comments on variances

Overall

Total NADS allocation for all partners for the current five-year cycle (2012–13 to 2016–17) is reported as $568.5 million—a $7.6‑million decrease from what was reported in the 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report ($576.1 million). This reduction is primarily due to a $22.4‑million decrease to Correctional Service Canada (CSC) (as requested following a funding assessment done in 2013–14 where CSC decided to return the balance of the funding to the fiscal framework); also, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s (RCMP) allocation was decreased by $7.4 million (RCMP’s planned spending figures have been adjusted to reflect approved annual reference levels within the Federal Policing Program; under the RCMP’s newly established Federal Policing Service Delivery Model, resources are continuously re-aligned to address the highest-level operational priorities). However, these amounts are then mostly offset by a $21.5‑million increase to Health Canada (to reflect renewed funding received for the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program’s Mental Wellness Teams under NADS).

Justice Canada

As of April 1st, 2015, the Drug Treatment Court Funding Program (DTCFP) no longer funds pilot projects; rather, it provides funding to the provinces and territories through negotiated agreements. The provinces and territories then work directly with service providers in their jurisdictions to provide support to drug treatment courts. Nine provinces and two territories have successfully negotiated, or are in the process of negotiating, agreements. The remaining two jurisdictions (New Brunswick and Nunavut) are not currently negotiating agreements but do participate in the DTCFP Working Group, which comprises provincial and territorial officials who meet via teleconference on a quarterly basis to discuss issues relating to drug treatment courts and to share best practices.

Health Canada

The variance between planned and actual spending under the “Controlled Substances (Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives)” is mainly due to delays in staffing and signing of contracts.

The variance between planned and actual spending under “First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions” is due to actual spending related to program management and oversight of the NADS that were recorded under the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse program (NNADAP). This occurs because funding for NADS and NNADAP are integrated at the community level.

The net variance between planned and actual spending under the “Office of Controlled Substances” is mainly due to delays in staffing, which was partially offset by an excess number of inspections of Licenced Dealers carried out beyond the planned target.

The variance between planned and actual spending under the “Prescription Drug Abuse” is mainly due to delays in staffing, resulting in project delays related to advertising campaigns for raising awareness on prescription drug abuse.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Due to internal CIHR restructuring, a report on the outcomes of the 18 grants funded in the first phase of NADS has been delayed and is expected to be completed in fall 2016.

RCMP

The RCMP fully spent its annual funding appropriation in support of the stated objective(s) of NADS. The RCMP also incurred expenditures above and beyond the appropriation as a result of its efforts to deliver against the broader mandate(s) of this horizontal initiative.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

The increase in actual spending is mainly due to the higher proportion of hours spent on files carried over from previous fiscal years that came before the courts in 2015–16 (223,318 hours or 77 percent of overall time recorded), as well as a high proportion of moderate and high-complexity files. This includes 569 files that include organized crime components. Also, it should be noted that most NADS files include charges other than those related to serious drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, mainly Criminal Code charges. As a result, the time entered on such files will constitute an overestimation of actual NADS-related activity. Since time recorded against litigation files is not initiative- or charge-specific, it is not possible to specifically attribute an exact number of hours to specific charges. The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions’ A-base funding, Drug Prosecution Fund (for Crown agent costs), and funding stemming from the former Canada Drug Strategy, as well as NADS funding itself, have so far been sufficient to cover costs related to incremental increases in NADS prosecutions and prosecution‑related activity.

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

In April 2015, GAC approved multi-year Annual Voluntary Contribution funding projects submitted by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States (OAS) Inter‑American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD), for implementation from 2015 to 2018. Further to this decision, GAC’s NADS Plan and Priorities, submitted in November 2014 with only OAS-CICAD as the recipient, became obsolete. The revised Expected Results 10.1 and 10.2 are provided to report on the UNODC and the OAS-CICAD projects implemented with NADS funding in fiscal year 2015–16.

Results to be achieved by non‑federal and non‑governmental partners

not applicable

Contact information

Danièle Ménard
NADS
Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section
Justice Canada
(613) 954-2730
Daniele.Menard@justice.gc.ca

Planning Information
Federal Organizations Link to the organization’s program(s) Contributing programs and activities Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015-16 Actual Spending 2015–16 Expected Results 2015-16 Actual results against targets
Department of Justice Canada Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework Drug Treatment Court Funding Program $18.2M $3.6M $3.6MTable note ii [ER 1.1] [AR 1.1]
Youth Justice Fund $7.9M $1.6M $1.4MTable note ii [ER 1.2] [AR 1.2]
Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.2M $0.2M $0.5MTable note ii [ER 1.3] [AR 1.3]
Internal Services Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.1M $0.2M $0.2MTable note ii [ER 1.3] [AR 1.3]
National Anti-Drug Strategy $0.2M $0.0M $0.0MTable note ii [ER 1.4] [AR 1.4]
Health Canada Controlled Substances Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (ASDI) $128.4M $22.8M $21.9M

[ER 2.1]

[ER 2.2]

[ER 2.3]

[AR 2.1]

[AR 2.2]

[AR 2.3]

First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) $56.4M $12.1M $11.7M [ER 2.4] [AR 2.4]
Controlled Substances Office of Controlled Substances $31.9M $6.4M $5.9M [ER 2.5] [AR 2.5]
Transfer to Regional Programs Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities $9.1M $1.8M $2.1M [ER 2.5] [AR 2.5]
Drug Analysis Services $50.0M $9.9M $9.9M

[ER 2.5]

[ER 2.6]

[AR 2.5]

[AR 2.6]

Drug Analysis Services $4.5M $0.9M $0.9M

[ER 2.5]

[ER 2.6]

[AR 2.5]

[AR 2.6]

Total Prescription Drug Abuse $21.4M $8.4M $7.4M [ER 2.7] [AR 2.7]
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Horizontal Health Research Initiatives Research on Drug Treatment Models $7.9M $2.0M $2.0MTable note ii [ER 3.1] [AR 3.1]
Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation $3.3M $0.6M $0.3MTable note iii [ER 4.1] [AR 4.1]
Internal Services $0.1M $0.0M $0.0M [ER 4.2] [AR 4.2]
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing Public Engagement $12.5M $2.2M $2.2M [ER 5.1] [AR 5.1]
Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations $94.6M $16.7M $16.7M [ER 5.2] [AR 5.2]
Internal Services $12.5M $2.8M $2.8M    
Correctional Service Canada Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $6.2M $0.9M $0.7MTable note iv [ER 6.1] [AR 6.1]
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $1.9M $1.0M $1.2MTable note iv [ER 6.1] [AR 6.1]
Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions $5.6M $1.1M $0.3MTable note iii [ER 7.1] [AR 7.1]
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability $2.1M $0.4M $0.1MTable note iii [ER 7.2] [AR 7.2]
Internal Services $1.7M $0.4M $0.1MTable note iii [ER 7.3] [AR 7.3]
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Drug, Criminal Code, and terrorism prosecution program Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services $17.0M $3.4M $23.0MTable note iii [ER 8.1] [AR 8.1]
Prosecution of Serious Drug Offences under the CDSA $36.2M $7.2M $3.2MTable note iii [ER 8.2] [AR 8.2]
Internal Services Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services $2.5M $0.5M $2.8MTable note iii [ER 8.3] [AR 8.3]
Prosecution of Serious Drug Offences under the CDSA $5.3M $1.1M $0.4MTable note iii [ER 8.3] [AR 8.3]
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment Targeting, Intelligence, Security Screening $7.7M $1.5M $1.5MTable note ii [ER 9.1] [AR 9.1]
Criminal Investigations Targeting, Intelligence, Security Screening $1.2M 0.2M $0.2MTable note ii [ER 9.2] [AR 9.2]
Internal Services $7.5M $1.5M $1.5MTable note ii [ER 9.3] [AR 9.3]
Global Affairs Canada Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to UNODC and CICAD $4.5M $0.9M $0.9MTable note iii

[ER 10.1]

[ER 10.2]

[AR 10.1]

[AR 10.2]

Canada Revenue Agency Reporting Compliance Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate $5.0M $1.0M $1.4MTable note iii [ER 11.1] [AR 11.1]
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Services $3.0M $0.6M $0.6M [ER 12.1] [AR 12.1]
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Financial Intelligence Program Financial intelligence Program $0.0M $0.0M $0.7MTable note iv [ER 13.1] [AR 13.1]
Total for all federal organizations $568.5MTable note i $114.5MTable note i $128.1M Not applicable
Table note i

The amount for the 2015-16 total allocation and the planned spending might not add up due to rounding.

Return to table note i referrer

Table note ii

Amounts exclude EBP premiums of 20 percent and PSPC Accommodation premiums of 13 percent.

Return to table note ii referrer

Table note iii

Amounts include EBP premiums of 20 percent and PSPC Accommodation premiums of 13 percent.

Return to table note iii referrer

Table note iv

Amounts include EBP premiums of 20 percent and exclude PSPC Accommodation premiums of 13 percent.

Return to table note iv referrer

Expected Results (ER)

Department of Justice Canada

ER 1.1

Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.

ER 1.2

To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to:

  • introduce, pilot, and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate outcomes:

  • projects on Treatment Services and Program Enhancements.
  • enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations.

Intermediate outcomes:

  • increased availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for targeted populations in areas of need.
  • improved treatment systems, programs, and services to address illicit drug dependency in targeted populations in areas of need.
ER 1.3
  • exercise overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintain the Strategy’s governance structure;
  • lead and coordinate all NADS communications activities; and
  • take lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation, and performance reporting.
ER 1.4

Support the work of Justice programs by providing key corporate services.

Health Canada

ER 2.1

The Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) plans to enhance capacity among targeted populations to make informed decisions about substance use, including illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse, and reduce risk-taking behaviors associated with substance use among youth. In addition, the program will aim to increase the uptake of health promotion and prevention knowledge and resources and increase community engagement in order to prevent substance use among youth.

ER 2.2

The Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) plans to continue its efforts to strengthen substance abuse treatment systems for illicit drugs and prescription drug abuse. In particular, new projects will focus on assisting in strengthening treatment systems to facilitate the implementation of evidence-informed practices; increase capacity for planning and evaluating; and enhance opportunities for knowledge sharing.

ER 2.3

In 2015–16, the new Anti-Drug Strategy Initiative (ADSI) program (that combines DSCIF and DTFP) will focus on enhancing collaboration and knowledge exchange within and among stakeholders; making evidence-informed information and resources available to stakeholders; strengthening community and provincial/territorial capacity to address substance abuse; and improving the capacity of target populations to make informed decisions about substance abuse. Additionally, ADSI will contribute to reduced risk-taking behavior associated with substance abuse and increase efficiency and effectiveness of treatment and prevention programs, services, and systems.

ER 2.4

The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to enhance capacity to plan and deliver a range of treatment services and programs to First Nations and Inuit communities, and an increased availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs in areas of need. These results will align with the NADS Performance Measurement Strategy, and activities that Health Canada’s FNIHB has reported on in previous years of the NADS Initiative.

The progress of the expected results will be measured by the:

  • nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas;
  • proportion of treatment facilities accredited;
  • proportion of addictions counsellors in treatment centres who are certified;
  • changes in stakeholder perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in Strategy-supported investment areas; and
  • types of collaborative partnerships with Aboriginal organizations to strengthen systems, programs, and services.
ER 2.5

The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) plans to continue its efforts to streamline and increase the transparency of its processes to authorize and issue licenses, permits, registrations, and authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances, precursor chemicals, and industrial hemp. OCS will also continue to work with partners and regulated parties to reduce the risk of diversion of controlled substances and precursor chemicals by promoting and monitoring compliance with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations.

The Regions and Programs Bureau will continue to monitor compliance of licensed dealers of controlled substances and precursors to ensure compliance under the CDSA and its regulations.

ER 2.6

The Drug Analysis Service (DAS) plans to:

  • increase effectiveness in gathering, analyzing, and sharing intelligence and analyzing evidence related to clandestine laboratories and drug analyses;
  • increase awareness of illicit drug and precursor chemicals issues for enforcement officials through targeted training;
  • increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations;
  • reduce health, safety, and security risks associated with illicit drug production; and
  • improve intelligence and evidence of its clients.

The success and progress of this plan will be measured by:

  • the number and nature of clandestine laboratories dismantled with DAS assistance or for which DAS provided support;
  • the number of testimonies in court;
  • the average time to respond to analyses requests and the number and nature of drug exhibits received and analyzed;
  • the number and type of training sessions delivered and the number of participants;
  • the level of clients’ satisfaction related to training and to service provided during clandestine laboratory investigations/dismantlement’s;
  • DAS’s collaboration with stakeholders and partners;
  • the level of awareness of illegal drug production and trends and on the risks and safety precautions necessary to safely dismantle illegal drug operations;
  • the number and nature of injuries to law enforcement officers/other first responders and the level of additional risk to the environment as a result of investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations; and
  • the potential production capacity based on precursors and critical reagents found during a clandestine laboratory dismantlement where DAS was involved.
ER 2.7
Prescription Drug Abuse

Economic Action Plan 2014 commits new funding over five years to expand the focus of NADS from illicit drugs to include prescription drug abuse. The funding identified above reflects the new funding that Health Canada will receive in support of prescription drug abuse activities between 2014–15 and 2016–17.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 3.1

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s total allocation has increased from $4.875 million to $7.875 million and planned spending for 2015–16 from $0.975 million to $1.975 million to reflect the additional funding received to address prescription drug abuse as per Economic Action Plan 2014.

Starting in 2015–16, it is expected that four Research Nodes (teams) will be funded under the Canadian Research Initiative on Substance Misuse. These Research Nodes will be part of a research network to undertake national studies of substance misuse research in Canada.

A competition for study grants on prescription drug abuse will be launched. The Research Nodes will also participate in a workshop to review research accomplishments, enhance collaboration and knowledge sharing, align strategic directions, and support the achievement of the Research Nodes’ outcomes.

Two meetings will be held for the Executive Committee of the research network to provide a national coordination of the network’s activities, including research priority setting, establishing common measures for trials, overseeing aspects of research ethics, defining a knowledge translation plan, and assessing its progression.

A report on the outcomes of the 18 grants funded in the first phase of NADS funding, based on publications and reports from the funded researchers, will be available in fall 2015.

Public Safety Canada

ER 4.1

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

The target is to host Enforcement Action Plan Working Group meetings; lead and participate in domestic meetings and conferences; and represent Public Safety and the portfolio at international conventions and conferences.

ER 4.2

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 5.1

Federal Policing will launch its National Mobilization Strategy to Prevent Serious and Organized Crimes. As part of this Strategy, the RCMP will focus its prevention efforts on enhancing youth and public and private sector awareness of the risks associated with youth engagement in serious and organized crime. In keeping with its ongoing efforts, the RCMP will continue to focus its youth engagement activities on prevention programming by enhancing young people’s understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use and abuse and its links to serious and organized crime activity. In addition, the RCMP will launch a comprehensive process to begin to further enhance its dialogue with partners/stakeholders focusing on the promotion of key mechanisms, such as community hubs, to support longer-term investments needed to improve drug prevention interventions for children and youth. Building upon some successes, the RCMP will more actively promote key elements of such RCMP programs as the Drug Endangered Children (DEC) program and the RCMP’s National Youth Initiatives–National Youth Advisory Committee in an effort to encourage and facilitate broader engagement of key partners in community‑based prevention programming. DEC builds community capacity to intervene in the lives of children exposed to the harms of drug activity by bringing together stakeholders/agencies involved in intervening/investigating drug-endangered children.

ER 5.2

Federal Policing will continue to pursue enforcement efforts targeting organized crime groups involved in the illicit cultivation and distribution of marijuana, and the importation, production, and trafficking of illicit synthetic drugs and precursor chemicals. Over the years, mid- and high-level organized crime groups operating in Canada have become increasingly complex and continue to diversify their operating environments, which often transcend provincial, territorial, and national boundaries. In order to assist with this evolving threat, these efforts will also be incorporated into a broad RCMP Strategy to Combat Organized Crime, which will focus on all aspects of the organization’s efforts to tackle these dynamic illicit operations. The Strategy will build on current efforts to prioritize major operational projects, including investigations that target organized crime groups involved in illicit drugs.

Correctional Service Canada

ER 6.1

Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (Schedule II).

Correctional Service Canada expects to supervise approximately 43 provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II), approximately 29 of those with a residency requirement. It is expected that a total number of 936 case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) will be completed.

Parole Board of Canada

ER 7.1

This funding will provide the Parole Board of Canada (PBC) with the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of Bill C-10 on mandatory minimum penalties.

ER 7.2

This funding will provide the PBC with the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings, and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the Bill C-10 on mandatory minimum penalties.

ER 7.3

Support client-focused service by providing key corporate services.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

ER 8.1

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

ER 8.2

Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the Mandatory Minimum Penalties.

ER 8.3

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 9.1

Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.

Continue to increase intelligence and analytical support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under NADS.

Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and to improve intelligence activities such as targeting, information sharing, and laboratory analysis related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

ER 9.2

The Criminal Investigations program will continue to work collaboratively with other law enforcement agencies when goods fall within the CDSA by ensuring schedules are intercepted and a border nexus identified. Activities include gathering evidence at ports of entry to participation in controlled deliveries and joint investigations with partner law enforcement agencies.

Continuation of additional sampling, analysis, and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.

ER 9.3

Support the work of the Canada Border Services Agency programs by providing key corporate services.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 10.1

Assist the UNODC in fulfilling its mandate in the fight against illicit drug trafficking and transnational crime.

ER 10.2

Assist the CICAD in fulfilling its mandate in the fight against illicit drug trafficking in the Americas.

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 11.1
  • 30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re)assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.
  • Leads will be obtained by the Criminal Investigations Directorate, from the RCMP, and from other enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities relating to illegal drug use, production, and distribution and forwarded to the Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate to be considered for audit.
  • Emphasis will continue to be placed on intelligence-led strategic file selection in an effort to reduce the profitability of illegal/criminal activities in this sector.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 12.1

Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

ER 13.1

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) will continue to be an unfunded partner within the NADS initiative. Given the importance of the NADS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions. FINTRAC will continue to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners.

Actual Results (AR)

Department of Justice Canada

AR 1.1

Drug Treatment Court (DTC) pilot sites contribute to a reduction in criminal recidivism as well as a reduction in illicit drug use while in the program. Data collected through the Drug Treatment Court Information System show that drug treatment court clients had clean urine screen tests (i.e., no illicit drug use) 69 percent of the time that they were in the program.

The April 2015 DTC Funding Program Evaluation–Final Report showed positive results in key areas:

  • retention of participants and graduation rates;
  • reduction in drug use by participants;
  • improved social stability and use of community supports by participants; and
  • reduction of criminal involvement among DTC graduates.

The Evaluation report includes evidence that graduates are significantly less likely to re‑offend than those who have left the program or who have not participated. It also found that the DTC participants who did re-offend had fewer drug offences than the comparison group. 

AR 1.2

In 2015–16, the Youth Justice Fund committed support to nine projects to enhance capacity to plan/deliver a range of drug treatment services and programs targeted at young people in conflict with the law. Eight of these projects were ongoing from previous fiscal years and one began in 2015­16. All but one of these projects were community pilot projects exploring interventions to address substance abuse by youth involved in the youth criminal justice system. One of the projects was specifically focused on interventions for youth with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder who also struggle with substance abuse and was delivered both in custody and community. The total value of projects with a focus on drug treatment for 2015–16 was $1,312,533 in contributions. 

AR 1.3

In 2015–16, Justice Canada provided effective leadership of NADS through:

  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • organizing senior-level committee meetings to discuss future activities, policy, communications, and evaluation and performance reporting;
  • coordinating NADS communication activities, including making greater use of social media;
  • taking lead responsibility for performance reporting, including working with partner departments to finalize the NADS Performance Measurement Strategy and to launch the process to hire an evaluation firm to conduct an evaluation of NADS in 2016-17;
  • leading implementation of the “Management Response and Action Plan to the 2012 Impact Evaluation of the Strategy”; and
  • participating in domestic and international drug policy discussions with partner departments.
AR 1.4

Provision of corporate services in support of Justice programs.

Health Canada

AR 2.1 & AR 2.2

In 2015-16, the new Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives (ADSI) was created combining the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) and the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP). The results achieved are reported under AR 2.3.

AR 2.3
Prevention

The prevention component of the ADSI, formerly DSCIF, supported 34 projects across Canada focused on substance use health promotion and prevention targeting both youth and communities. Of these 34 projects, 22 contributed to acquired/improved youth capacity (knowledge and skills) to make informed decisions about substance use; eight contributed to reducing risk-taking behaviours associated with youth substance use; eight contributed to increasing community engagement; four contributed to uptake of knowledge and resources; and five contributed to improving community capacity and community practices related to substance use health promotion and prevention.

ADSI also supported six new projects focused on prescription drug abuse and prescriber education, as well as funding to support National Prescription Drug Drop-Off Day 2015, run by the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, where over 450kg of prescription drugs were returned for disposal. Of these seven projects, three contributed to enhanced collaboration and knowledge exchange within and among stakeholders; and three contributed to increased awareness and understanding of prescription drug abuse and its negative consequences. Further contributions at the immediate and intermediate outcome levels are expected as the projects advance.

Over 139,000 youth, 11,400 parents, and 2,100 workers/schools have been reached through ADSI funded prevention interventions. Projects focused on capacity building have resulted in over 13,500 youth and 4,900 workers/teachers being trained on various topics including peer leadership, facilitation, life skills, critical thinking and youth engagement.

Treatment

The treatment component of ADSI, formerly DTFP, supported 13 projects across Canada with both provincial and territorial governments and national non-governmental organizations to strengthen substance use treatment systems. Of these 13 projects, 12 contributed to implementation of evidence-informed practices; 10 contributed to strengthening performance measurement and evaluation capacity; and 9 contributed to enhanced knowledge sharing.

Additionally, evaluations of treatment projects reported successes in strengthening substance abuse treatment systems across Canada:

  • the introduction of an increased reporting against national treatment indicators has provided consistent data on treatment system utilization across the country for the first time;
  • the production of evidence-based standards and guidelines has led to increased consistency and quality of treatment care; and
  • prior to ADSI treatment funding, many provinces and territories reported working independently where collaboration with other sectors or regions was not a priority. Evidence shows that treatment funding helped establish the conditions necessary to support collaboration, including the development of a national knowledge exchange platform for all treatment projects, leading to improvements to efficiency and effectiveness and quality for substance abuse treatment systems and services. 
AR 2.4

Health Canada’s mental health and addictions programming continues to support activities to improve access to quality services for First Nations and Inuit communities.

New and enhanced services such as Mental Wellness Teams (MWTs) are now located in all Health Canada regions. MWTs are community-based, client-centered, multi-disciplinary teams that provide a variety of culturally safe mental health and addictions services and supports to First Nations and Inuit communities. They are owned, defined, and driven by the community and included Aboriginal traditional, cultural, and mainstream clinical approaches to mental wellness services, which span the continuum of care from prevention to after-care.

Since the launch of NADS, 37 treatment centres have improved their addiction related services to more effectively meet community needs, e.g. for Indigenous women and youth, and people with co-occurring mental health issues and/or prescription drug abuse issues. The number of accredited treatment centres has been maintained at 84 percent, which is the same percentage as in previous years; the percentage of full-time, certified addiction treatment centre counsellors is up from 68 percent to 78 percent in the last five years. The overall number of certified addiction workers has increased to 463, up from 358 in 2009–10.

AR 2.5

Activities in 2015–16 focused on a continued effort to streamline and increase the transparency of the processes to authorize and issue licences, permits, registrations, and authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances and precursor chemicals. Health Canada continued to work with partners and regulated parties to reduce the risk of diversion of controlled substances and precursor chemicals by promoting and monitoring compliance with the CDSA and its regulations.

During 2015–16, the Controlled Substances Program, Regions and Programs Bureau, has continued to monitor and inspect Licensed Dealers of controlled substances and precursors to ensure compliance under the CDSA and its regulations. Inspectors in each region work to achieve this objective though a number of measures, including by carrying out inspections and inventory audits of Licensed Dealers (both pre-licensing and during the life of the licence), reviewing their records, ensuring their transactions are appropriately documented, follow-up to actions to ensure full compliance, etc.

For 2015–16, under NADS, the Regions and Programs Bureau had planned target of carrying out 140 inspections of Licensed Dealers. The number of Inspections carried out was 184.

AR 2.6

In 2015–16, the Drug Analysis Service (DAS) received 116,998 exhibits (42,096 cannabis and 74,902 non-cannabis) and analyzed 116,482 exhibits (42,651 cannabis and 73,831 non-cannabis) for which results were returned to clients with an average of 25 days for regular analyses (DAS service standard is 60 days).

Contributions were made to increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations by its involvement in 30 suspected clandestine laboratory cases, including on-site dismantlement for 18 of them. The majority of the clandestine laboratories dismantled with DAS assistance were involving methamphetamine production. There were also MDA, fentanyl, furanylfentanyl, MDMA, ketamine, GHB, and psilocybin laboratories. Of the clients, 96.8 percent were satisfied with support provided during investigations/dismantlement of clandestine laboratories.

It is estimated that the potential production capacity of these laboratories based on precursors and critical reagents found during dismantlement is approximately 148kg of methamphetamine, 2kg of fentanyl, and 385kg of GHB. Note that some cases investigated in 2015–16 will be completed in 2016–17.

DAS is not reporting any injury or incident that would have had an environmental impact in 2015–16 for clandestine laboratories where DAS provided assistance. The extent to which operations have been safely dismantled was assessed by tracking the number and nature of injuries and/or environmental risk caused by unsafe handling of chemicals.

Thirteen testimonies were provided in court related to drug identification or clandestine laboratories dismantlement.

DAS delivered a total of 37 training sessions to 960 law enforcement officers and/or first responders where 98.9 percent of the participants were satisfied with training provided (note that some sessions covered more than one topic): 21 sessions covered Drug Analysis and Identification, 12 covered Evidence and Exhibit Sampling, and 14 covered Dismantling a Clandestine Laboratory. Of training survey respondents, 92.5 percent reported an increase in the level of awareness of the danger and safety precautions necessary to safely dismantle illegal drug operations. and 97.5 percent reported an increase in the level of awareness of illegal drug production and trends.

DAS conducted four regional client consultations and participated in numerous regional, national and international committees or working groups, namely Controlled Substances Security Committee; Standard Council of Canada Forensic Working Group; Scientific Working Group on Drugs (hosted by the United States’ Drug Enforcement Administration); British Columbia Drug Surveillance and Intelligence Working Group; Comité d’échanges sur les drogues; Comité des drogues de synthèse; and the Canadian Standards Association/Canadian General Standards Board project for the development of a Canadian Standard for personal protective equipment for Clan Lab Operations.

AR 2.7

The Prescription Drug Abuse (PDA) initiative is a five-year campaign to raise awareness in regard to the harms and the importance of proper monitoring, storing, and disposing of prescription drugs. On May 9, 2015, the National Prescription Drop Off Day was promoted along with messaging through web advertising on the proper storing, monitoring, and disposing of prescription drugs. This resulted in 15.3 million impressionsFootnote 1 in 3 weeks with a strong performance—a 0.09 percent click-through rate (CTR), which is almost twice the industry average.

This outreach was followed by a series of four testimonial-style videos of recovering drug abusers and of parents/family affected by PDA. The videos had over 2.2 million Canadian views on YouTube in five weeks, outperforming the Preventing Drug Abuse Media Campaign (marijuana and PDA) from 2014 at 1.8 million views in 10 weeks. The videos also received over 560,000 views on Facebook and had 1,000 shares.

In mid-July, as part of the Prevention Drug Abuse initiative, both the marijuana and PDA TV ads aired in rotation. The web advertising delivered 19.7 million impressions in three weeks with a CTR of almost 2.8 times more than the industry average. The search engine marketing portion of the advertising generated over 20,000 clicks to Health Canada-related web pages, and web traffic increased by over 200 percent.

One of Health Canada’s commitments is to increase intervention to minimize diversion of prescription drugs from pharmacies through increased federal inspections.

In 2015–16, the total number of pharmacy inspections planned was 175; the total number of pharmacy inspections carried out was 232.

A community pharmacy inspection program, as well as support for the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop Canadian standards and indicators for more coordinated data collection on prescription drug abuse, was also completed.

The FPT Committee on PDA continued to exchange information and establish best practices in developing and implementing Prescription Monitoring Programs.

Funding to address PDA has been distributed to First Nations communities, band councils, and treatment centres targeting case management and critical supports, and for prevention training activities for service delivery workers in select communities. Also, a PDA crisis intervention team co-located in Manitoba and Saskatchewan is being led by the Opaskwayak Cree Nation and the College of Physicians and Surgeons respectively to bring additional support to targeted communities with support from First Nations and Inuit Health Regional Offices.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

AR 3.1

As anticipated, four Research Nodes (British Columbia, Prairies, Ontario, and Quebec/Maritimes) were approved for funding under the Canadian Research Initiative on Substance Misuse (CRISM). Reporting requirements were developed to enable monitoring of CRISM as it progresses over its five-year term.

A competition for study grants on prescription drug abuse was funded and directed to the CRISM Nodes in November 2015.

A workshop focused on prescription drug abuse, held in May 2015, enabled consultation between researchers, including the Nodes’ leads, and service providers to identify priorities and suggestions for knowledge synthesis.

Two CRISM Network Executive Meetings were held involving CRISM Nodes’ leads, other researchers, service providers, and representatives of people living with substance misuse. The meetings provided the opportunity to clarify the roles and responsibilities, finalize reporting requirements, and discuss strategies for the long-term sustainability of the Network.

Public Safety Canada

AR 4.1

In 2015–16, Public Safety continued to contribute to safer communities and more effective policing by hosting the Enforcement Action Plan Working Group meetings; leading and participating in domestic meetings and conferences such as the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Issues of Substance Conference and Board of Directors meeting, as well as the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and Canadian Association of Police Governance meetings; and representing Public Safety Canada and the portfolio at international conventions and conferences such as the negotiation session for the Hemispheric Drug Strategy 2016 to 2020 Plan of Action in Mexico City.

AR 4.2

Public Safety supported the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

AR 5.1

In 2015–16, RCMP personnel in the Federal Policing Public Engagement unit (FPPE) delivered a variety of drug awareness and prevention programs and training sessions across the country in order to deliver on the NADS objectives. The FPPE also identified and developed new partnerships at both the local and national level. In collaboration with partners/stakeholders, community-based prevention programs were identified and law enforcement tools and knowledge were shared, which helped strengthen and broaden community capacity to intervene with identified vulnerable persons.

At the National Headquarters level, FPPE and RCMP Contract Policing National Youth Services created a joint Crime Prevention Working Group and better aligned their crime prevention strategies. This resulted in new opportunities to reach youth audiences with federally mandated anti-drug messaging and education as well as highlighted the need to develop a more comprehensive RCMP-wide crime prevention strategy with common indicators and similar performance management frameworks across programs.

Out of the ten different drug awareness and prevention programs offered by FPPE in 2015‑16, the three primary and most popular to be delivered across communities were Drug Abuse Resistance Education Keeping it Real, Drug Endangered Children, and the Aboriginal Shield Program. Some of the awareness and prevention initiatives were community- and partner-led (police assisted). This led to stakeholders/agencies collaborating and establishing broader ownership and acceptance of programs, while also promoting a shared approach/responsibility. 

AR 5.2

In 2015–16, the RCMP remained focused on enforcement initiatives identified in collaboration with government partners under NADS. The RCMP continued to support enforcement aimed at reducing the availability, production, and distribution of illegal synthetic drugs in Canada, thus addressing some of the overall influence of organized crime on drug trafficking in Canada.

At the international level, in 2015–16, following a request from the People’s Republic of China, the RCMP provided training on synthetic drug investigations from the initiation of the investigation up to the seizure of clandestine laboratories to more than 150 participants in Beijing and Shanghai. During that same period, the RCMP also provided synthetic drug training to Cuban authorities, with over 25 participants attending the session in Havana, Cuba.

The RCMP has also continued to maintain its relationship with the Canadian chemical industry by providing training related to chemical diversion. The RCMP’s Chemical Diversion Program has evolved in the new RCMP Federal Policing service delivery model through an “alert-bulletin” system, which continues to be used for a series of unregulated essential chemicals being sought for the production of synthetic drugs by illicit producers. Through the Chemical Diversion Program, members of the Canadian Chemical Association voluntarily provide tips to the RCMP, allowing investigators to initiate investigations which may lead to the identification of new targets involved in the illicit synthetic drug trade.

During the 2015-16 reporting period, there were several RCMP investigations across the country that included seizures of illicit substances including, but not limited to, methamphetamine, precursor chemicals, and new psychoactive substances including, but not limited to, fentanyl.

Due to competing internal priorities, the RCMP’s Strategy to Combat Organized Crime was not finalized in 2015–16. Notwithstanding, the RCMP’s Federal Policing program, in collaboration with domestic and international partners, continues to focus investigative resources toward the highest-level organized crime groups and networks.

Marijuana Grow Operations

Since 1989, the RCMP has been conducting an annual joint forces operation with the Canadian Armed Forces, known as Operation SABOT. SABOT is a yearly detection and eradication operation targeting outdoor marijuana grow operations during the late summer/early fall period. With the assistance of the Royal Canadian Air Force, RCMP investigators deploy helicopters and crews across Canada in order to locate and dismantle outdoor marijuana plantations. During 2015–16, Operation SABOT was completed in Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick.

Correctional Service Canada

AR 6.1

Correctional Service Canada (CSC) receives $1.9 million yearly to cover the cost associated with the case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II).

During 2015–16, CSC supervised on average 46 provincial offenders convicted of a Schedule II offence (drug offence), which is slightly higher than the average for 2014–15. The residency rate is also similar to the 2014–15 rate, with an average of 30 offenders with a residency requirement (65 percent of the supervised provincial offender population with a Schedule II offence, compared with 66 percent on average in 2014–15). While the overall population of offenders convicted of a Schedule II offence (both incarcerated and in the community) has decreased, the proportion of supervised offenders with a Schedule II offence has increased (43/174 or 25 percent in 2014–15 to 46/159 or 29 percent in 2015‑16).

With respect to case preparation, a total of 849 case preparation reports (pre- and post‑release) were completed in 2014–15 for the entire provincial population under CSC’s jurisdiction. In 2015–16, a total of 812 case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) were completed, which represents a decrease of 37. Extrapolating the number of case preparation reports completed in comparison to the number of provincial offenders convicted of a Schedule II offence (drug offence), an average of 87.3 case preparation reports (pre- and post- release) were completed for the target population.

Overall, the data is demonstrating that the number of provincial offenders under CSC’s jurisdiction has remained relatively constant in 2015–16, including the number of offenders being gradually transitioned through community-based accommodations, with only slight variations between type of offence (Schedule II vs. other) and location. The proportion of provincial offenders with a Schedule II offence, compared to the overall supervised provincial population has increased by 4 percent.

Parole Board of Canada

AR 7.1

This funding provided the Parole Board of Canada (PBC) with the capacity to effectively manage its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC collects information and reports on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole). Provincial parole reviews are by application only, and as such the number received varies from year to year and is not directly related to the number of incarcerated offenders.

AR 7.2

This funding provided the PBC with the capacity to provide information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings, and individuals who seek access to the decision registry as a result of offenders sentenced under the provisions of the legislation. In a similar manner, PBC reports on the extent of involvement of victims and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC. Provincial parole reviews are by application only, and as such the number received varies from year to year and is not directly related to the number of incarcerated offenders.

Effective management of both these responsibilities contributes to public safety and reinforces public confidence in the justice system.

AR 7.3

Provision of key corporate services in support of client-focused service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

AR 8.1

In 2015–16, the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) handled 24,223 litigation files dealing with drug production and distribution offences (pursuant to the CDSA sections 5(1), 5(2), 6(1), 6(2), 7(1), 7(2) and 7.1). Files are handled by staff prosecutors and Crown agents. These include new files opened in 2015–16 (10,836) as well as files carried over from previous fiscal years against which time has been recorded (13,387). Of these, 21,156 included distribution offences, whereas 709 included production offences. An additional 1,654 files included both production and distribution offences. The remaining 704 files are CDSA-related but have not yet been updated to indicate which charge applies. Actual spending reflects in-house prosecution costs only since agent costs fall under the Drug Prosecution Fund.

AR 8.2

In 2015–16, the ODPP handled 3,633 NADS-related files that included 5,866 charges involving mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs), dedicating 45,255 hours to the conduct of these files. MMPs under the CDSA came into effect in November 2012.

AR 8.3

In 2015–16, the ODPP allocated 11 percent of overall NADS-related expenditures for corporate support to in-house legal staff.

Canada Border Services Agency

AR 9.1

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has undertaken numerous projects and analytical products to promote situational awareness and operational intervention and disruption of drug smuggling in 2015–16. The CBSA has successfully operationalized intelligence information to coordinate an ongoing operation, targeting a number of specific drug-smuggling organizations.

Key projects in 2015–16 included a dedicated effort to combat internal conspiracies; this has resulted in the identification of over 100 internal conspiracies and the seizure of over 1,000kg of drugs. As well, as a result of these coordinated efforts, internal conspiracy networks were identified in several different modes of transportation in Canada, and disrupted in several foreign jurisdictions.

AR 9.2

The Criminal Investigations Program opened nine new investigations related to steroids and precursor chemicals in 2015–16. As of March 31, 2016, a total of 12 cases were still under investigation. One investigation was closed during this fiscal period due to insufficient evidence to proceed criminally.

AR 9.3

The Science and Engineering Directorate (CBSA Laboratory) continues to provide scientific support to the CBSA by testing and sampling exhibits related to cross-border trafficking of illicit drugs and precursor chemicals. For 2015–16, the CBSA Laboratory analyzed 5,952 suspected contraband substances (including precursor chemicals) and participated in a mobile laboratory operation. Overall, 100 exhibits were found to contain CDSA Class A precursors (including gamma-Butyrolactone, ephedrine, potassium permanganate, and isosafrole) and many other exhibits were found to contain unregulated precursor chemicals.

The CBSA Laboratory noted a continued increase in the number of opioid-related exhibits such as fentanyl, fentanyl precursors, and a number of fentanyl analogues. These exhibits pose a challenge for the CBSA personnel both in the field and in the laboratory, as fentanyl and its analogues are highly toxic in their pure forms and accidental exposure to such chemicals can be life-threatening. As a result of the health and safety concerns posed by this threat, the CBSA has modified the sampling and testing of suspected fentanyl importations. Specifically, any packages suspected to contain fentanyl are now being sent directly to the CBSA Laboratory without field testing. The laboratory revised many of its operating procedures, including the implementation of a “buddy system” to ensure that employees had access to emergency assistance and services in the event of an accidental exposure to fentanyl.

The CBSA Laboratory continues to investigate field tools to assist in the testing and sampling of drugs and precursor chemicals. In 2015–16, the laboratory investigated detection of fentanyl (and fentanyl analogues) using field equipment and assisted in the preparation of a new pilot project for drug field testing using immunoassay-based (DrugID) test kits, scheduled to take place in 2016–17. In addition, the laboratory continues to systematically investigate potential false positive alarms using current field testing equipment (Ionscan, Narcotics Identification Kits tests) to improve the use of equipment in an operational setting.

Global Affairs Canada

AR 10.1

The Annual Voluntary Contribution funding provided to the UNODC has supported the organization’s efforts to assist beneficiary States in addressing illicit drug trafficking and transnational crime by launching a Container Control Programme (CPP) in Latin America and the Caribbean. The CCP increases port security to facilitate legitimate trade and prevents transnational organized crime trafficking through containerized cargo.

AR 10.2

The Annual Voluntary Contribution funding provided to the OAS-CICAD has maximized the impact of the organization’s efforts to facilitate a greater international coordination and collaboration of beneficiary States and government entities in their international counter‑narcotics efforts in the Americas.

  • The OAS-CICAD launched a training project aimed at broadening the consistent application of the Financial Action Task Force standards on anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism practices for select countries in both Central America and the Caribbean.
  • The OAS-CICAD extended the implementation of activities supported in 2013–14 and 2014–15 to strengthen the investigation of Internet sales of drugs and the monitoring of the impact of illicit drugs in the Americas.
  • The OAS-CICAD also continued activities funded in 2013–14 and 2014–15 for the establishment of the Caribbean Regional Counterdrug Intelligence School.

All of the above have added support to the efforts to reduce the flow of illicit drugs into Canada, and have benefited Canadian and international security by hindering the activities of drug-trafficking organizations.

Canada Revenue Agency

AR 11.1
  • 22 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulted in (re)assessments of $8.3 million of federal taxes, including penalties.
  • Leads were obtained by the Criminal Investigators Directorate (via their Liaison Officers) from the RCMP and from other enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities relating to illegal drug use, production, and distribution and forwarded to the Small and Medium Enterprise Directorate for audit.
  • High-quality referrals from the RCMP resulted in a higher-than-expected recovery result.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

AR 12.1

The Forensic Accounting Management Group used three resources (Senior Forensic Accountants) with the funding received from NADS. These resources helped to increase the overall operational capacity of NADS-related files and increased the forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of a suspect were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

AR 13.1

In 2015–16, FINTRAC disclosed a total of 1,655 cases to law enforcement, including 368 unique cases that related to at least one drug-related offence, an increase of over 10 percent from the 334 unique drug-related disclosures made in 2014–15. These case disclosures relate to suspicions of money laundering or terrorist financing where the predicate offence is believed to be drug distribution or production.

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