2017-18 Departmental Plan - Supplementary Information Tables

Horizontal Initiatives

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

National Anti-Drug Strategy

Lead department(s)

Department of Justice Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

  • Health Canada;
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research;
  • Public Safety Canada;
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police;
  • Correctional Service Canada;
  • Parole Board of Canada;
  • Public Prosecution Service of Canada;
  • Canada Border Services Agency;
  • Global Affairs Canada;
  • Canada Revenue Agency;
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada; and
  • Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.

Non‑federal and non‑governmental partner(s)

not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2007-08 (First year of the National Anti-Drug Strategy)

First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12)

Second reporting cycle (2012-13 to 2016-17)

Third reporting cycle (2017-18 to 2021-22)

End date of the horizontal initiative

2021-22 and Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date) (dollars)

First reporting cycle (2007-08 to 2011-12Footnote 1): $563.4M

Second reporting period (2012-13 to 2016-17Footnote 2): $574.3M

Third reporting cycle (2017-18 to 2021-22): $556,468,517

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$1,025,060,970

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$914,387,468

Funding contributed by non‑federal and non‑governmental partners

not applicable

Governance structures

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC) and Director General-level working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The ADMSC, which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions and makes recommendations for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate. It also oversees the work of the four Director general level working groups.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans, as well as the work of a Prevention and Treatment Sub-Working Group. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan, as well as the work of a new Sub-Committee on Information Sharing and Surveillance. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy, as well as the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy, which includes making the decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative to the public and stakeholder groups and ensuring coordination of such communications. It also oversees the work of a Communications Sub-Working Group.

Contact information

Danièle Ménard
Director General and General Counsel
Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section
Justice Canada
(613) 954-2730
daniele.menard@justice.gc.ca

Results information

Description of the horizontal initiative

The National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Through Speech from the Throne 2013 and Economic Action Plan 2014, the Government of Canada expanded the Strategy to include prescription drug abuse. The goal of the Strategy is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse, treat dependency, and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The Prevention Action Plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs and abusing prescription drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects, and to develop and implement community-based interventions and initiatives. The Treatment Action Plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The Enforcement Action Plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Shared outcome of federal partners

  • Reduced prescription drug abuse in Canada;
  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced negative health and social impacts and crime related to illicit drug use and prescription drug abuse; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Performance indicator(s)

Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, reduced Prescription Drug Abuse (PDA) in Canada

Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, reduced demand for illicit drugs (e.g. deterred or delayed onset of use among populations targeted for prevention)

Trends in illicit drug use among populations targeted (e.g. age of onset, prevalence, patterns of use)

Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, a reduction in the health and social impacts of illicit drugs and PDA in targeted areas

Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, a reduction in crime related to illicit drug use in targeted areas

Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, a reduction in the supply of illicit drugs within Canada

Department of Justice

(PI 1.1)

  • Percentage of Drug Treatment Court participants retained in the program for six months; and
  • Percentage of total clean Urine Drug Test results.

(PI 1.2)

Number/nature of projects, targeted groups; type of program (e.g. training, program development, conference).

Number and type of Knowledge enhancement (KE) mechanisms created by intended audience.

Number, frequency, reach of a) internal KE opportunities for NADS partners, e.g. GCpedia, capacity building sessions, speaker series, webinars, and b) external KES opportunities.

(PI 1.3)

Extent to which NADS is well coordinated and to which policy was developed.

Extent to which NADS governance structure is well maintained.

Extent to which NADS communications is well coordinated.

Extent to which evaluations, performance reports and planning reports meet Treasury Board requirements and were produced in a timely manner.

(PI 1.4)

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

(PI 3.1)

The number of, scope and nature of funded research projects that support NADS’ goals. Information will be collected from research nodes’ progress reports in June 2017 and from the research Network in January 2018.

Public Safety Canada

(PI 4.1)

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

Chair the Enforcement Action Plan Working Group meetings; lead and participate in stakeholder consultations on drugs and the opioid crisis; lead and participate in domestic meetings and conferences such as the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) Issues of Substance Conference and Board of Directors meeting, as well as the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and Canadian Association of Police Governance meetings; and represent Public Safety and the portfolio at international assemblies and conferences, such as the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime meetings (UNODC), and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission.

(PI 4.2)

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

(PI 5.1)

Awareness:

  • Number and nature of awareness products. 
  • Number and category (targeted audiences) of Canadians reached.
  • Percentage of participants from targeted audiences who demonstrate an increase in awareness of substance misuse.

Partnerships:

  • Number and nature of number of partnerships and collaborations.
  • extent partners have been engaged.

(PI 5.2)

Investigations:

  • Number and nature of collaboration and coordination efforts related to enforcement with local partners.
  • Number and nature of collaboration and coordination efforts related to enforcement with international partners.
  • Number of investigations initiated regarding illicit drug production and/or distribution.
  • Number/type/nature of seizures made by clandestine laboratory teams related to investigations on illicit drug production and/or distribution.
Correctional Services Canada (CSC)

(PI 6.1)

  • Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) supervised by CSC.
  • Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) with a residency requirement.
  • Total number of case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) completed for all provincial offenders.
Parole Board of Canada (PBC)

(PI 7.1)

  • The percentage of offenders on parole who are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.
  • The percentage of offenders who completed their sentences on full parole and who are not re-admitted after release because of a violent conviction (five years post-warrant expiry).
  • The percentage of decisions that are affirmed by the Appeal Division.

(PI 7.2)

  • The percentage of individuals (i.e., general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.
  • The percentage of those who access the PBC’s Internet site that finds the information useful.
  • The percentage of requests for information through the Decision Registry that are responded to in a timely manner.
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

(PI 8.1)

  • Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year.
  • Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel.

(PI 8.2)

  • Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.
  • Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel where mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

(PI 8.3)

Percentage of overall NADS-related expenditures for corporate support to in-house legal staff.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

(PI 9.1)

Average dollar value of goods, shipments and conveyances seized attributed to Intelligence

(PI 9.2)

CBSA will explore the possibility of creating a P.I. for Criminal Investigations.

Global Affairs Canada

(PI 10.1)

The degree to which NADS-funded projects, implemented by the Organization of American States:

i) help law enforcement stop the flow of money that organized crime makes from the illicit drug trade in targeted beneficiary countries; and,

ii) improve maritime security to reduce the flow of illicit drugs into Canada in targeted beneficiary countries.

Activities include targeted trainings in the use of Special Investigative Techniques, international information exchange and legal mutual assistance related to Anti-Money Laundering as well as training in maritime domain security according to International Ship and Port Security Standards.

Canada Revenue Agency

(PI 11.1)

Change rate: 80% or more of audits resulting in (re) assessments

Public Services and Procurement Canada

(PI 12.1)

The number of active NADS files (projects) worked on related to determining whether the assets of a suspect were derived from criminal activities

Number of reports produced. This is further measured by classifying stage or status of each report (for example; still in legal process, settled, gone to trial, or dropped).

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

(PI 13.1)

Total number of FINTRAC disclosures of actionable financial intelligence made to regime partners, and the number of unique disclosures of actionable financial intelligence that relate to at least one drug-related offence.

Target(s)

Department of Justice

(T 1.1)

In support of the NADS Treatment component, eligible adult offenders are supported to address their drug dependencies. Targets:

  • 25% of participants are retained for six months in federally funded Drug Treatment Court programs; and
  • 50% of all Urine Drug Test results are clean.

(T 1.2)

The full budget allocation is forecasted to be expanded for the upcoming fiscal year to support drug treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system. Specifically, there will be 2 projects continuing from previous years and up to 9 new projects commencing in 2017-18. 

(T 1.3)

No targets were created for the NADS lead role. 

(T 1.4)

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

(T 3.1)

CIHR will continue delivering research funds, as projected, to the Network and through the Prescription Drug Abuse Operating Grant as appropriated.

CIHR will collect two progress reports from the Canadian Research Initiative on Substance Misuse in 2017-18. The research Nodes will report on their respective activities and progress in June 2017 and the research Network will report on the OPTIMA trial in January 2018.

Public Safety Canada

(T 4.1)

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

The targets are to implement a comprehensive cannabis regime that reduces the involvement of organized crime; to implement a comprehensive regime to interdict illicit devices and illicit substances illegally imported to Canada through actions including proposed pill press registry and legislative amendments allowing opening international mail weighing 30 grams or less; and to develop a field test project plan on oral fluid drug screening devices.

(T 4.2)

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

(T 5.1)

TBD – based on:

  • The results of the current NADS Evaluation;
  • Direction of the new drug strategy; and
  • Direction of senior management.

(T 5.2)

TBD – based on:

  • The development of foreign partnerships to stem the flow of opioids to Canada;
  • Direction of the new drug strategy;
Correctional Services Canada (CSC)

(T 6.1)

  • Approximately 52 provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) are supervised by CSC.
  • Approximately 34 provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) have a residency requirement.
  • Approximately 832 case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) are completed for all provincial offenders.
Parole Board of Canada

(T 7.1)

98% of offenders on parole are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.

(T 7.2)

80% of individuals who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

(T 8.1)

Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC’s workload and mandate.

(T 8.2)

Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC’s workload and mandate.

(T 8.3)

Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC’s workload and mandate.

Global Affairs Canada

(T 10.1)

  • 60% of training recipients utilize training material in anti‑money laundering investigation/cases;
  • 75% of training recipients report applying the knowledge and skills learned in the training in their daily work to secure ports and/or the national maritime domain.
Canada Revenue Agency

(T 11.1)

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs. Leads will be obtained by the Criminal Investigations Division, from the RCMP, and from other enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities relating to illegal drug use, production and distribution; these will be forwarded to the Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate to be considered for audit. Emphasis will continue to be placed on intelligence-led strategic file selection in an effort to reduce the profitability of illegal/criminal activities in this sector.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

(T 12.1)

The Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG) is expected to maintain the equivalent of three dedicated resources to work with law enforcement agencies. The targets are dependent on the projects assigned to FAMG by law enforcement agencies and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

(T 13.1)

FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), Departmental files, component evaluations

Ongoing research and trends/analysis

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non‑governmental partners

Not applicable

Planning Information
Link to department’s Program Inventory Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2017–18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017–18 Expected results 2017–18 Performance indicators 2017–18 Targets Link to department’s Strategic Outcomes [or Core Responsibilities] Link to government priorities
Department of Justice
Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework Drug Treatment Court Funding Program (Treatment Action Plan) $18,156,380 $3,631,276 [ER 1.1] [PI 1.1] [T 1.1] A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity
Youth Justice Fund (Treatment Action Plan) $7,907,470 $1,581,494 [ER 1.2] [PI 1.2] [T 1.2] A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity
Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1,167,070 $233,414 [ER 1.3] [PI 1.3] [T 1.3] A fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system Security & Opportunity
Internal Services Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1,109,090 $221,818
National Anti-Drug Strategy (Treatment Action Plan) $199,945 $39,989 [ER 1.4] [PI 1.4] [T 1.4] Internal Services Not applicable
Health Canada
Controlled Substances Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP)Footnote 3  (Prevention & Treatment Action Plans) $113,937,570 $22,787,514Table note ii [ER 2.1]Footnote 4     Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable
First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) (Treatment Action Plan) $60,357,585 $12,071,517 [ER 2.2]     First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status Not applicable
Controlled Substances Office of Controlled Substances (Enforcement Action Plan) $31,221,420 $6,244,284 [ER 2.3]     Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable
Transfer to Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities (Enforcement Action Plan) $9,753,510 $1,950,702
Controlled Substances / First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions Drug Analysis Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $53,825,065 $10,765,013 [ER 2.4]     Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable
Prescription Drug Abuse (Prevention Action Plan) $32,977,487 $9,423,416 [ER 2.5]

Canadians securely dispose of prescription drugs

And

Pharmacies are compliant with the CDSA and its regulations.

[PI 2.5]  Quantity of drugs, in kg, collected yearly through drop-off events

And

% of pharmacies compliant with the CDSA and its regulations

[T 2.5]  20,000 kg/year

And

95%

Health risks and benefits associated with food products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Not applicable
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Horizontal Health Research Initiatives Research on Drug Treatment Models (Treatment Action Plan) $6,874,990 $1,974,998 [ER 3.1] [PI 3.1] [T 3.1] Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge Not applicable
Public Safety Canada
Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation (Enforcement Action Plan) $2,942,660 $588,532 [ER 4.1] [PI 4.1] [T 4.1] A Safe and Resilient Canada: Countering Crime (1.3) Security and opportunity
Internal Services $75,710 $15,142 [ER 4.2] [PI 4.2] [T 4.2] Internal Services Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Federal Policing (formerly Drugs and Organized Crime)Footnote 5 Federal Policing Public Engagement (FPPE) (Prevention Action Plan) $11,058,290 $2,211,658 [ER 5.1] [PI 5.1] [T 5.1] Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced Legalization and regulation of marijuana
Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations (Enforcement Action Plan) $82,274,750 $16,454,950 [ER 5.2] [PI 5.2] [T 5.2] Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced Legalization and regulation of marijuana
Internal Services $15,477,825 $3,095,565       Internal Services Not applicable
Correctional Service Canada
Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders (Enforcement Action Plan) $3,027,280 $605,456 [ER 6.1] [PI 6.1] [T 6.1] The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety Safe and Secure Communities
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders (Enforcement Action Plan) $6,231,200 $1,246,240
Parole Board of Canada
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions (Enforcement Action Plan) $5,557,500Table note i $222,000Table note i [ER 7.1] [PI 7.1] [T 7.1] Conditional Release Decisions Safe and Secure Canada
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Enforcement Action Plan) $2,137,500Table note i $98,000Table note i [ER 7.2] [PI 7.2] [T 7.2] Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Safe and Secure Canada
Internal Services $1,710,000Table note i $45,000Table note i [ER 7.3]     Internal Services Not applicable
Public Prosecution Service of Canada
Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $15,596,460 $3,119,292 [ER 8.1] [PI 8.1] [T 8.1] Criminal and regulatory offences under federal law are prosecuted by the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions in an independent, impartial and fair manner. Not applicable
Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable. (Enforcement Action Plan) $33,182,275 $6,636,455 [ER 8.2] [PI 8.2] [T 8.2] Criminal and regulatory offences under federal law are prosecuted by the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions in an independent, impartial and fair manner. Not applicable
Internal Services Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $2,345,825 $469,165 [ER 8.3] [PI 8.3] [T 8.3] Internal Services Not applicable
Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable. (Enforcement Action Plan) $4,863,660 $972,732
Canada Border Services Agency
Risk Assessment Targeting Intelligence Security Screening (Enforcement Action Plan) $9,800,000 $2,100,000

[ER 9.1.1]

[ER 9.1.2]

[ER 9.1.3]

[PI 9.1]   International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks. Security and Opportunity
Criminal Investigations $1,400,000 $200,000

[ER 9.2.1]

[ER 9.2.2]

[PI 9.2]   International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks. Security and Opportunity
Internal Services $8,800,000 $1,300,000 [ER 9.3]     Internal Services Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada
Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS) (Enforcement Action Plan) $4,500,000Table note ii $900,000Table note ii [ER 10.1] [PI 10.1] [T 10.1] International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation – Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages. Security and Opportunity
Canada Revenue Agency
Domestic Compliance Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate (Enforcement Action Plan) $5,000,000Table note i $922,614 [ER 11.1] [PI 11.1] [T 11.1] Tax: Canadian obtain services and information that are accessible, timely, useful, and fair Not applicable
Public Services and Procurement Canada
Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group (Enforcement Action Plan) $3,000,000Table note i $600,000Table note i [ER 12.1] [PI 12.1] [T 12.1] FAMG, like the department of Public Services and Procurement Canada upholds public confidence in government wide business and ensures government carries out its operations with transparency and fairness, probity and sound management practices and with the highest standards of professionalism and integrity Security and Opportunity
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program (Enforcement Action Plan) $0 $0 [ER 13.1] [PI 13.1] [T 13.1] A Canadian financial system resistant to money laundering and terrorist financing Not applicable.
Total for all federal organizations $556,468,517 $112,728,236 Not applicable

Total Funding Allocation and Planned Spending amounts are shown including EBP premiums of 20% and excluding Accommodation premiums of 13%, unless specified otherwise.

Table note i

Amount includes EBP premiums of 20% and includes Accommodation premiums of 13%.

Return to table note i referrer

Table note ii

Amount constitutes Grants and/or Contributions, therefore do not include EBP or Accommodation premiums.

Return to table note ii referrer

Expected Results

Department of Justice

ER 1.1

Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court participants.

ER 1.2

To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to:

  • Introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • Share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

ER 1.3

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment, and enforcement, and prescription drug abuse through:

  • Exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • Maintaining the Strategy’s governance structure;
  • Leading and Coordinating all National Anti-Drug Strategy communications activities; and
  • Taking lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation and performance reporting. In 2017-18, this will include publishing the evaluation and updating the Performance Measurement Strategy.

ER 1.4

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Health Canada

ER 2.1

In 2017-18, the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) plans to complete the assessment and support the collaborative development of a new cohort of provincial and territorial, national and community-based health promotion, prevention, harm reduction and treatment projects resulting from a call for proposals launched late in the 2016-17 fiscal year. The SUAP will also support the implementation of the early stages of several new national projects approved for funding in the latter half of the 2016-17 fiscal year. With the focus on new projects, the expected results will primarily be linked to immediate/short-term outcomes, including enhanced collaboration and knowledge exchange; availability of evidence-informed knowledge products; and performance measurement capacity.Footnote 6

ER 2.2

First Nations and Inuit Health Branch have capacity to plan and deliver a range of treatment services and programs to First Nations and Inuit communities.

ER 2.3

Health Canada, through the Office of Controlled Substances (Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch), will renew and enhance the robustness and transparency of its processes to authorize and issue licences, permits, registrations and authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances, precursor chemicals and industrial hemp. Health Canada will also continue working with partners and regulated parties to reduce the risk of diversion of controlled substances and precursor chemicals by promoting and monitoring compliance with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations.

ER 2.4

Health Canada, through the Drug Analysis Service, Regulatory and Operations Regions Branch, has plans to increase effectiveness in gathering, analyzing, and sharing intelligence and analyzing evidence related to clandestine laboratories and drug analyses; increase awareness of illicit drug and precursor chemicals issues for enforcement officials through targeted training; increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations; reduce health, safety and security risks associated with illicit drug production; and improve intelligence and evidence of its clients.

ER 2.5

Health Canada will continue to engage provinces and territories to advance collaborative efforts to combat prescription drug abuse. Health Canada will serve as the secretariat for the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Prescription Monitoring Program Network, which will facilitate the creation of new prescription monitoring programs and enhance existing Prescription Monitoring Programs through sharing best practices, data, advice and mentoring. The department will also fund and oversee the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s efforts to develop a national approach to prescription drug surveillance.

Health Canada, through the Office of Drug Science and Surveillance (ODSS), Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, will improve research and data analysis to support the prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse (PDA), and will expand internal monitoring and reporting on PDA. ODSS will continue to develop methodology and add new data sources as they become available.

In an effort to contribute to the prevention of PDA, the marketing campaign, led by the Communications and Public Affairs Branch, Health Canada, will continue to increase awareness about the harms and risks associated with PDA among parents and youth, and educate Canadians on the importance of safely storing, monitoring and disposing of prescription drugs.

The Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch and the Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch will continue to undertake inspections of pharmacies across Canada, focusing on regulatory promotion and compliance with the goal of minimizing potential diversion of controlled substances for illicit use. Health Canada is also updating and disseminating drug destruction guidelines for pharmacies to ensure appropriate collection, handling, and disposal of unused or expired pharmaceuticals.

The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch have the capacity to enhance prevention and treatment services in First Nations communities, specific to prescription drug abuse.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 3.1

In 2017-18, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research will continue to fund the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM), a national research consortium in substance misuse, with four research Nodes across Canada (located in British Columbia, Prairies, Ontario, and Quebec/Maritimes) that enhances collaboration between researchers and service providers.

In 2017-18, it is expected that the Nodes will work to clearly define roles, accountabilities and dispute resolution mechanisms that will enable the Network to achieve defined goals and integrate representatives of people living with substance misuse, service providers, researchers and decision-makers participation in the governance of the CRISM Network.

Moreover, in 2017-18, it is expected that the Nodes will continue to conduct research to enhance prevention and treatment for people living with substance misuse, improve research capacity in this research area, and continue to build important relationships with clinical practitioners and people with experience, both of whom offer perspectives that are critical to the success of the Network.

The CRISM Oversight Committee will meet bi-annually over the course of the next year to review the progress made by the Nodes and the Network overall, and to provide strategic advice as required.

As well, the Network Executive Committee, which meets annually, is expected to meet again in late 2017-18 to discuss national coordination activities, strategies, progress, best practices and challenges.

CIHR will also continue to fund the first study, a research collaboration involving the four Nodes, to address Prescription Drug Abuse. Known as the OPTIMA trial, the teams are working together with the overarching objective of comparing different models of care involving both Canadian standard of care treatments in opioid addiction, namely methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone (also known as Suboxone).

Public Safety Canada

ER 4.1

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

The expected results are the establishment of a comprehensive regime that keeps cannabis and other illicit drugs out of children’s hands; the hosting of Enforcement Action Plan Working Group meetings; leadership and participation in domestic meetings and conferences; and the representation of Public Safety and the portfolio at international conventions and conferences.

ER 4.2

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 5.1

The RCMP will increase drug awareness among Canadians by developing public education products, supporting community outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

ER 5.2

The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on organized crime networks involved in the importation and trafficking of illicit drugs, including illicit opioids.

Correctional Service Canada

ER 6.1

Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (Schedule II).

Parole Board of Canada

ER 7.1

  • Conditional release decisions contribute to keeping communities safe; and
  • Conditional release decisions adhere to the law, the Parole Board of Canada’s policies, and the principles of fundamental justice.

ER 7.2

  • The timely exchange of relevant information with victims, offenders, observers, other components of the criminal justice system, and the general public.

ER 7.3

Support to Programs.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

ER 8.1

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in all provinces and territories regardless of which police agency investigates the alleged offences, except Quebec and New Brunswick. In these two provinces, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the RCMP.

ER 8.2

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

ER 8.3

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 9.1.1

Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.

ER 9.1.2

Continue to increase intelligence and analytical support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the Strategy.

ER 9.1.3

Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting, information sharing and laboratory analysis related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

ER 9.2.1

The Criminal Investigations program will continue to work collaboratively with other Law Enforcement Agencies (LEA) when goods fall within the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA), schedules are intercepted, and a border nexus identified. Activities include gathering evidence at ports of entry to participation in controlled deliveries and joint investigations with partner LEA.

ER 9.2.2

Continuation of additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.

ER 9.3

Support the work of the CBSA programs by providing key corporate services.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 10.1

Assist the Organization of American States in fulfilling its mandate in the fight against illicit drug trafficking in the Americas.

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 11.1. 

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 12.1

Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

ER 13.1

In 2017-2018 FINTRAC will continue to be an unfunded partner within the NADS. Given the importance of the NADS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

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