Three Years On: Mentoring at the Department of Justice and the Public Prosecution Service of Canada

3. Results (cont'd)

3.5 Ended Relationships

On the survey, all respondents are asked whether they are in a current relationship or whether their mentoring relationship had ended. If they answered the latter, they were directed to a separate survey. This section will deal specifically with the results from the survey for those individuals who had been in a mentoring relationship which ended.

3.5.1 Details of Ended Mentoring Relationships

Eighteen associates and 21 mentors responded that they had been in a mentoring relationship that had ended. Among these mentors, 16 had one associate and the remainder had multiple associates. Among the mentors with multiple associates, the number of associates ranged from two to four. Two of the associates never met with their mentors.

Due to the small sample who responded, information is presented in the figures, not in percentages, but in actual counts (n=number). Additional results from EE group members will not be presented due to the small sample.

As shown in Figure 14 below, there is variability in terms of how long associates and mentors had been in their mentoring relationship when it ended.

Figure 14: Length of time in mentoring relationship when it ended

Figure 14, chart representing Length of time in mentoring relationship when it ended

Figure 14 - Text equivalent

This is a vertical bar chart that illustrates the length of time in a mentoring relationship when it ended.

The Y axis is measured in number of individuals and increases by increments of 1 up to 9.

The X axis lists the following options for length of time: Less than 3 months, 4 to 6 months, 7 months to 1 year, More than 1 year to 2 years, Over 2 years. 5 Associates and 3 Mentors were in a mentoring relationship for less than 3 months when it ended; 1 Associate and 1 Mentor were in a mentoring relationship for 4 to 6 months when it ended; 5 Associates and 6 Mentors were in a mentoring relationship for 7 months to 1 year when it ended; 5 Associates and 8 Mentors were in a mentoring relationship for more than 1 year to 2 years when it ended; and 0 Associates and 1 Mentor were in a mentoring relationship for over 2 years when it ended.

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; Associates N = 16; Mentors N = 19;

Figure 15 below shows that there was also quite a bit of variability in terms of how often associates and mentors had met when in their previous mentoring relationship.

Figure 15: Frequency of meetings – ended relationships

Figure 15, chart representing Frequency of meetings – ended relationships

Figure 15 - Text equivalent

This is a vertical bar chart that illustrates the frequency of meetings for ended relationships.

The Y axis is measured in number of individuals and increases by increments of 1 up to 7.

The X axis lists the following options for frequency of meetings: More than once a month, Once a month, Once every six to eight weeks, Once every three to four months, Once every five months or less often. 3 Associates and 6 Mentors said that they meet more than once a month; 4 Associates and 5 Mentors said that they meet once a month; 3 Associates and 2 Mentors said that they meet once every six to eight weeks; 3 Associates and 2 Mentors said that they meet once every three to four months; and 3 Associates and 4 Mentors said that they meet once every five months or less often.

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; Associates N = 16; Mentors N = 19

As shown in Figure 16 below, the majority of associates and mentors in ended relationships had met their mentor or associate in-person.

Figure 16: How associates and mentors met – ended relationships

Figure 16, chart representing how Associates and Mentors in ended relationships met

Figure 16 - Text equivalent

This is a vertical bar chart that illustrates how, or by what means, Associates and Mentors connected for their meetings.

The Y axis is measured in number of individuals and increases by increments of 2 from 0 to 14.

The X axis lists the following options for how Associates and Mentors met: In-person meeting, Email, Telephone, Other, and Not applicable. 10 Associates and 13 Mentors said that they met in-person; 1 Associate and 3 Mentors said they met through email; 2 Associates and 3 Mentors said they met via telephone; 1 Associate said he or she met through an “Other” means; and 2 Associates answered not applicable.

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; Associates N = 16; Mentors N = 19

As shown in Figure 17 below, the majority of ended-relationship meetings lasted up to about one hour. None of the respondents indicated that their meetings lasted two or more hours.

Figure 17: Length of meetings – ended relationships

Figure 17, chart representing length of meetings for associates and mentors in ended relationships

Figure 17 - Text equivalent

This is a vertical bar chart that illustrates how long mentoring meetings last for both Associates and Mentors.

The Y axis is measured in number of individuals and increases by increments of 1 up to 10.

The X axis lists the following options for length of time: Less than an hour, About an hour, One and half hours, Different each meeting. 6 Associates and 5 Mentors said they meet for less than an hour; 7Associates and 9 Mentors said they meet for about an hour; 1 Associate and 1 Mentor said they meet for one and a half hours; and 1 Associate and 3 Mentors answered that the length of time was different each meeting.

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; Associates N = 15; Mentors N = 18

Associates and mentors that had been in a mentoring relationship that ended were asked if they found it easy to access their associate or mentor. Fourteen associates and 12 mentors indicated that it had been easy to access their mentor/associate.

3.5.2 Meeting Expectations

As with the current relationships survey, associates were asked if they discussed their expectations concerning the goals they wanted to achieve through the mentoring relationship with their previous mentor. Thirteen associates indicated that they had discussed these expectations with their previous mentor. In addition, 8 associates said that they were satisfied with their progress in terms of what they wanted to achieve, and six associates were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their progress. None of the participants stated that they were dissatisfied with their progress.

3.5.3 Benefits of Mentoring to Associates and Mentors – Ended Relationships

Survey respondents were also asked to indicate the extent that their ended mentoring relationship had affected various areas. As shown in Table 8 below, a number of associates indicated that their previous mentoring relationship helped them to think in different ways about work-related issues and increased their understanding of corporate culture and values. In Tables 8 and 9 below, the responses “To a great extent” and “To some extent” are combined into one category entitled “To an extent”.

Table 8: Extent that mentoring relationship affected various areas - AssociatesFootnote 15
Topic To an extent
n (%)
To a little extent
n (%)
To no extent at all
n (%)
Not applicablen (%)
Led to new career opportunities 3 (18%) 1 (6%) 8 (47%) 5 (29%)
Broadened your network of contacts 5 (29%) 3 (18%) 4 (24%) 5 (29%)
Improved your job satisfaction 6 (35%) 2 (12%) 5 (29%) 4 (24%)
Increased your understanding of corporate culture and values 7 (41%) 3 (18%) 4 (24%) 3 (18%)
Helped to you working at JUS/PPSC 5 (29%) 1 (6%) 7 (41%) 4 (24%)
Helped you think in different ways about the work-related issues with which you are dealing 10 (59%) 1 (6%) 3 (18%) 3 (18%)
Provided you with a role model 5 (29%) 1 (6%) 5 (29%) 6 (35%)
Helped with your work-life balance 1 (6%) 5 (29%) 6 (35%) 5 (29%)
Enhanced your knowledge and skill set 7 (41%) 3 (18%) 3 (18%) 4 (24%)
Provided you with motivation to excel at your job 5 (29%) 2 (12%) 6 (35%) 4 (24%)
Prepared you for your next position 4 (24%) 2 (12%) 6 (35%) 5 (29%)

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; N = 17

Despite the short length of many of these relationships, there were still some positive outcomes, such as the 59% who indicated that the relationship helped them think in different ways about work-related issues.

Mentors were also asked the extent that their ended mentoring relationship had affected various areas. As shown in Table 9 below, a number of associates indicated that their previous mentoring relationship helped them feel that they have something to contribute to the organization and had been a valuable use of their time. Again, as with associates, there were positive outcomes.

Table 9: Extent that mentoring relationship affected various areas - MentorsFootnote 16
Topic To an extent
n (%)
To a little extent
n (%)
To no extent at all
n (%)
Not applicable
n (%)
Helped you feel valued and respected 10 (53%) 3 (16%) 1 (5%) 5 (26%)
Helped you feel you have something to contribute to the organization 15 (79%) 1 (5%) 1 (5%) 2 (11%)
Given you a better understanding of issues facing employees 12 (63%) 2 (11%) 5 (26%) 0 (0%)
Been a valuable use of your time 14 (74%) 3 (16%) 2 (11%) 0 (0%)
Been a learning experience 12 (63%) 5 26%) 2 (11%) 0 (0%)
Helped improve your own job performance 5 (26%) 4 (21%) 8 (42%) 2 (11%)
Created a renewed sense of purpose in your professional life 5 (26%) 2 (11%) 10 (53%) 2 (11%)
Helped develop your leadership capacity 8 (42%) 4 (21%) 5 (26%) 2 (11%)

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; N = 19

3.5.4 Satisfaction with the Ended Relationship – Associates and Mentors

Respondents who had been in a mentoring relationship that had ended were asked how satisfied they were with that particular mentoring relationship overall. As can be seen in Figure 18 below, many associates and mentors indicated that they were satisfied with their ended mentoring relationship overall. As with the presentation of other scale results, the rankings of the scale have been combined.

Figure 18: Satisfaction with ended mentoring relationship

Figure 18, chart representing Satisfaction with the ended mentoring relationship

Figure 18 - Text equivalent

This is a vertical bar chart that illustrates Associates’ and Mentors’ satisfaction with their mentoring relationship.

The Y axis is measured in number of individuals and increases by increments of 2 from 0 to 14.

The X axis lists the following options for levels of satisfaction: Satisfied, Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, and Dissatisfied. 9 Associates and 13 Mentors said they are satisfied with their mentoring relationship; 6 Associates and 2 Mentors said they are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their mentoring relationship; and 2 Associates and 4 Mentors said they were dissatisfied with their mentoring relationship.

Source: National Mentoring Program Survey 2011; Associates N = 17; Mentors N = 19

One associate, who was interviewed, expressed her dissatisfaction with the NMP and the relationship in the following way:

The program was not well-explained. The relationship lacked structure (e.g., direction, goals). The mentor, as the senior member, seems to have set the agenda as an unstructured 90 minute, coffee shop meeting. I was uncomfortable suggesting an alternative approach.

This was generally not time well spent. I wanted to get a better understanding of what was happening “behind the scenes”, to receive guidance on how to develop technical skill sets, to learn of opportunities to work with other people and to develop a network. None of this happened.

In spite of her dissatisfaction with this particular relationship, this associate said she would try another relationship. Overall, 15 associates and 17 mentors who had ended a mentoring relationship said that they would begin another mentoring relationship.

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