Department of Justice Canada Minister's Transition Book

Overview of the Department of Justice

Governance Framework

Mission

The Mission of the Department of Justice is to:

Departmental Program Alignment Architecture

The Department’s Program Alignment Architecture reflects the key activities the Department undertakes in support of the dual roles of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. The Department’s Program Alignment Architecture includes four program activities.

The Stewardship of the National Legal Framework: The Department fulfils its stewardship role by ensuring a bilingual and bijural national legal framework for the administration of justice that contributes to a safe and just society for all Canadians and confidence in Canada’s justice system. The Department develops and tests innovative approaches to strengthen the legal framework within the following domains: criminal law, youth criminal justice, sentencing, official languages, marriage and divorce, access to justice, and Aboriginal justice. In addition, in view of the federal government’s shared interest in a sustainable justice system, the Department promotes and facilitates ongoing dialogue with the provinces and territories in the areas of shared jurisdiction and provides funding for the delivery of programs that directly support federal policy objectives.

The Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime: The Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime (OFOVC) was created to provide a voice for victims of crime at the federal level and to ensure that the federal government meets its commitments to victims. The OFOVC provides direct information, referral and complaint-review services to its primary clients: victims, victims’ family members or representatives, victim-serving agencies, and other related stakeholders. The Office also helps raise awareness of systemic issues amongst all criminal justice and victim-serving personnel, and provides related recommendations and advice to the Government of Canada through the Minister of Justice. In order to fulfill its mandate, the OFOVC promotes access by victims to existing federal programs and services for victims; addresses complaints of victims about compliance with the provisions of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act; promotes awareness of the needs and concerns of victims and the applicable laws that benefit victims of crime, including

promoting the principles set out in the Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime; identifies and reviews emerging and systemic issues that negatively impact victims of crime; and facilitates access by victims to existing federal programs and services by providing them with information and referrals. The Ombudsman reports directly to the Minister of Justice and, as such, the Office falls outside the Department’s governance framework.

Legal Services to Government: The Department of Justice provides an integrated suite of high-quality legal advisory, litigation and legislative services to the Minister of Justice and to all federal departments and agencies to support them in meeting the Government’s policy and programming priorities and to advance the overall objectives of the Government. Services are provided through a network of departmental legal services units co-located with client departments and agencies, specialized legal capacities within national headquarters, and a network of regional offices and sub-offices providing legal advisory and litigation services to federal departments and agencies across the country.

Internal Services to the Department are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of the Department. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are the following: Change Management Office, Communications Branch, Office of the Corporate Counsel, Management and Chief Financial Officer Sector and Policy Sector. This program activity supports both of the Department's strategic outcomes. The high-quality services and support provided by Internal Services allow the Department to minimize corporate risks and support Government priorities.

Senior Committee Structure

The Department’s Senior Committee Structure consists of:

Executive Committee, chaired by the Deputy Minister, is the Department’s senior decision-making forum responsible for the overall strategic management of the Department’s legal, policy and program responsibilities. The Committee sets strategic direction, determines priorities, ensures objectives are met and maintains the departmental governance framework.

Policy Committee, chaired by the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy (co-chair position is currently vacant), is a Standing Advisory Committee to Executive Committee, which sets the broad priorities within which the Policy Committee fulfils its mandate. The Committee is the forum for senior level engagement, deliberation and substantive discussion on departmental and government-wide policy issues and emerging legal issues affecting policy. The Committee reviews, assesses and recommends strategic policy direction and departmental positions on horizontal policy proposals and initiatives for which the Department may or may not be the lead.

Management Committee, chaired by the Deputy Minister, is the Department of Justice’s senior decision-making forum responsible for legal service delivery, horizontal management, operational and accountability issues affecting the Department. The mandate of the Management Committee is to review, assess, share information and make decisions regarding: resource allocations; program and legal service delivery practices and issues; horizontal management issues and initiatives; and external accountability reporting. Specific domains that fall within the mandate of the Committee include issues related to: audit, financial management and control; integrated risk management; effective and efficient program delivery; commitments made in the context of the Department’s Deficit Reduction Action Plan (DRAP) submission, law practice management; information and knowledge management; information technology; security; contracting and procurement; asset management; accommodations; project management; and, performance measurement and reporting.

National Litigation Committee, chaired by the Assistant Deputy Attorney General, Litigation, is a Standing Advisory Committee to the Deputy Minister and Deputy Attorney General of Canada, who sets the broad priorities within which the Committee fulfils its mandate. The Committee is the forum for senior level engagement, deliberation and recommendation to the Deputy Minister and Minister on all matters before the Supreme Court of Canada and all other litigation that is identified as significant to the government, regardless of court level. The Committee ensures the consistency of litigation positions, that necessary consultations across government are undertaken, and that appropriate advice is given to the Deputy Minister, the Attorney General and the Government on significant litigation.

National Legal Advisory Committee, chaired by the Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Law, is a Standing Advisory Committee to the Deputy Minister, who sets the broad priorities within which the National Legal Advisory Committee fulfils its mandate. The Committee is the forum for senior level engagement and deliberation on complex legal matters that have broad implications for the Government. The Committee promotes and ensures consistency and quality in legal advice, including the consideration of an integrated whole-of-government approach, in developing departmental positions and in resolving conflicting or diverging legal positions.

Departmental Evaluation Committee, chaired by the Deputy Minister, is a senior advisory committee responsible for advising the Deputy Minister on all matters related to evaluation. The Committee advises the Deputy Minister on departmental evaluation plans, resourcing, final evaluation reports including management responses and horizontal departmental issues stemming from evaluations.

Departmental Audit Committee, chaired by the Deputy Minister, is an Advisory Committee to the Deputy Minister consisting of members both internal and external to the Government. External members are appointed by the Treasury Board of Canada. The Committee provides the Deputy Minister with independent, objective advice on risk management, control and accountability processes.

Governance Structure

Governance Structure

Deputy Minister’s Team

Deputy Minister and Deputy Attorney General

William F. Pentney, Q.C.

William F. Pentney, Deputy Minister and Deputy Attorney General

Biography

Appointed pursuant to subsection 3(1) of the Department of Justice Act, the Deputy Minister is responsible for the management and direction of the Department.

Under subsection 3(2) of the Department of Justice Act, the Deputy Minister is ex officio the Deputy Attorney General, except in respect of the powers, duties and functions that the Director of Public Prosecutions is authorized to exercise or perform under subsection 3(3) of the Director of Public Prosecutions Act.

The Deputy Minister supports the Minister to achieve the government’s objectives through four broad roles.

Manager of the Department

As the Department’s top public servant, the Deputy Minister has overall responsibility for managing the Department of Justice.

In addition, as a member of the community of deputy ministers, the Deputy Minister of Justice shares responsibility with colleagues in other government departments for contributing to the overall leadership of the public service under the direction of the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Chief Policy Advisor

The Deputy Minister acts as principal policy advisor to the Minister on matters within the Minister’s responsibility and authority. He coordinates policy development and ensures the departmental implementation of the Minister’s initiatives and priorities. He also advises on coherent policy development for and management of the Minister’s portfolio.

Accounting Officer

The Financial Administration Act provides that deputy ministers and deputy heads of government entities are designated accounting officers for their organizations. Under the legislation, the responsibilities of accounting officers arise within the framework of ministerial responsibility and accountability to Parliament. Accounting officers are required to appear before the appropriate parliamentary committee to answer questions regarding a specified range of responsibilities and duties relating to departmental management. These responsibilities include managing departmental resources in accordance with government policies and procedures, maintaining effective systems of internal control, and signing the departmental accounts.

Criminal and Civil Litigation

The Deputy Attorney General has important responsibilities in relation to both civil and criminal litigation.

He oversees and directs all civil and administrative litigation conducted by or on behalf of the Crown as well as litigation under the Extradition Act and the Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Act.

Following the creation of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the Deputy Attorney General retained a role as advisor to the Attorney General with respect to the exercise of powers reserved to the Attorney General under the Director of Public Prosecutions Act and may be called upon to intervene in proceedings raising questions of public interest or assume the conduct of a prosecution.

In addition, certain decisions in matters affecting national security or international relations must be made personally by the Attorney General or Deputy Attorney General.

Associate Deputy Minister

Pierre Legault

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Biography

Appointed pursuant to subsection 3(3) of the Department of Justice Act, the Associate Deputy Minister has the rank and status of a deputy head of a department and performs such powers duties and functions under the Deputy Minister.

The Associate Deputy Minister is responsible for liaising with the Barreau du Québec and the Federation of Law Societies of Canada.

Overseeing Roles of the Deputy Minister and Associate Deputy Minister

To ensure that important departmental and whole-of-government files are put forward for deputy-level attention, the Deputy Minister and Associate Deputy Minister assume responsibility for providing guidance, direction, and support to a number of Direct Reports across the Department.  The areas of responsibility are shared as follows:

Deputy Minister William F. Pentney, Q.C.

Associate Deputy Minister Pierre Legault

Resource Profile

Reporting Cycle for Government Expenditures

The reporting cycle for government expenditures establishes events leading up to the tabling of various documents and processes related to the government’s Budget and expenditure plan. The primary documents are: the Budget, prepared by the Minister of Finance, which outlines the government’s revenue projections and spending obligations; Estimates documents, which specify spending plans in greater details; and Public Accounts of Canada, which provide audited financial statements and represent the major accountability report of the Government of Canada.

Each fiscal year is divided into three parliamentary supply periods. Supply is the process by which the government asks Parliament to appropriate funds in support of approved programs and services. Supply periods are designated as follows:

Reporting Cycle for Government Expenditures

2015-2016 Financial Resources Estimated

The Department of Justice has the authority to spend $673.9 million through the 2015–2016 Main Estimates and also $296.2 million under the net voting authority (NVA) which provides authority to re-spend the revenues collected from other government departments and agencies for all types of legal services delivered including advisory, litigation and legislative/regulatory drafting and for the provision of internal support services to other government departments.

The Department of Justice received additional resources of $2.0 million through Supplementary Estimates (A)      [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s69(1)]     

Supplementary Estimates (A) - received:

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TB Central Votes:

Received:

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As of October 16th, the total spending authority is $998.5 million (include Main Estimates, Supplementary Estimates A and TB Vote 25).      [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.69(1)]     

Operating Resources (Vote 1) – Estimated and Statutory Resources

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Grants and Contributions (Vote 5) – Estimated

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Grants and Contributions

The Department of Justice provides funding to community organizations and other levels of government that are working to support our mandate, mission and values. The Department’s funding programs are designed to support Aboriginal communities, victims of crime, people with lower incomes, families and young people. The Department also supports projects that help Canadians understand the law and access the justice system in both official languages.

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Further details on each Grants and Contributions can be found from pages 3-15 to 3-21.

Access to Justice Services Agreements

$4,856,593

The Access to Justice Services Agreements (AJAs) are contribution agreements between the federal government and Canada’s three territories. They are the means by which the federal government supports the territories in delivering access to justice-related services which include legal aid (both criminal and civil), Aboriginal courtworker services and public legal education and information. The AJAs provide consolidated program funding for each of the three aforementioned program areas (i.e., none of the funding is specifically allocated to any of the program streams). This consolidated approach ensures accountability while allowing the territories the flexibility to develop and deliver justice-related programs as required by the unique needs and circumstances of their communities.

Legal Aid Program    

The Legal Aid Program consists of four components and delivers funding through contribution agreements primarily with the provinces. Details of the four components are described below.

Criminal Legal Aid

$108,327,507

Criminal Legal Aid funding helps to ensure access to legal services for economically disadvantaged persons living in Canada accused of serious, complex criminal offences and facing the likelihood of incarceration as well as youths charged under the Youth Criminal Justice Act. In addition, this funding helps to ensure that Canada cost- effectively meets its criminal legal aid responsibilities in federal prosecutions (such as under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act) so that prosecutions proceed and court delays are prevented.

Both levels of government have a mutual interest in ensuring that the criminal justice system, including criminal legal aid, is fair, effective and efficient, and that public confidence in the justice system is maintained. Responsibility for the provision of criminal justice is divided between the federal government, under its constitutional authority for criminal law and procedure, and the provincial governments, under their authority for the administration of justice and for property and civil rights.

Immigration and Refugee Legal Aid

$12,000,000

Immigration and Refugee (I&R) Legal Aid provides services to six jurisdictions: British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Quebec, Ontario, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Pursuant to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, claimants may be represented by a lawyer or other qualified person before all divisions of the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB).

I&R legal aid ensures that refugee claimants who qualify for legal aid are prepared and able to advance their cases before the IRB and the Federal Court.

In addition, I&R legal aid helps to prevent delays (e.g., adjournments and postponements) in immigration and refugee processes, reduces costs, addresses refugee claimants’ unique needs (e.g., the need for interpreters or to clarify the overall refugee process), and prevents orders against the federal government to provide funded counsel.

Public Security and Anti-terrorism

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The Legal Aid Program reimburses provincial and territorial legal aid plans for legal aid costs incurred in terrorism/national security-related cases. Public Security and Anti-terrorism legal aid ensures that indigent accused will not obtain a stay of proceedings simply because of the absence of counsel.      [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.69(1)]     

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Court-ordered Counsel in Federal Prosecutions

$1,650,000

The courts occasionally order the Department of Justice Canada to provide funded counsel in the context of federal prosecutions (primarily drug cases) where the accused does not qualify for legal aid. The Legal Aid Program reimburses the provinces, territories, or their respective legal aid plans for managing these costs on the Department’s behalf.

Aboriginal Courtwork Program

$4,911,363

The Aboriginal Courtwork (ACW) Program contributes funding to participating provinces for the provision of Aboriginal Courtworker services in criminal justice proceedings. Similar funding is provided to the three territories through Access to Justice Services Agreements. The objective of the ACW Program is to ensure that Aboriginal people in contact with the criminal justice system (whether as accused persons, victims, witnesses or family members) have access to fair, equitable, culturally sensitive treatment throughout the criminal justice process. Each year, approximately 173 Aboriginal Courtworkers provide direct services (information, support and referrals) to over 435 communities and approximately 59,000 Aboriginal clients (adult and youth) involved with the criminal justice system.

Justice Partnership and Innovation Program

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The Justice Partnership and Innovation Program (JPIP) provides resources to facilitate access to justice through various means, including the development of new approaches, the dissemination of law-related information and the testing of pilot projects. The overall goal of the JPIP is to contribute to policy development to ensure that the justice system remains accessible, efficient and effective. The components under the JPIP include: the Family Violence Initiative, Public Legal Education and Information (PLEI), grants to five selected organizations, and the Access to Justice for Aboriginal Women component (Violence Against Aboriginal Women and Girls).

Drug Treatment Court Funding Program

$3,631,276

The Drug Treatment Court (DTC) Funding Program, a component of the Treatment Action Plan of the National Anti-Drug Strategy, contributes funding to participating provinces for the development, delivery and evaluation of DTCs. DTCs are dedicated courts with the objective of reducing crime committed as a result of drug dependency through court-monitored treatment and community service support for non-violent offenders with drug addictions.

Aboriginal Justice Strategy

$12,700,000

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) is a federally led initiative, delivered in partnership with Canada’s provincial and territorial governments and Aboriginal communities. Created in 1991 as part of an overall federal Aboriginal crime strategy, the AJS enables Aboriginal communities to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice and, as such, provides timely and effective alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. Currently, the AJS funds approximately 275 community-based justice programs that serve over 800 Aboriginal communities.

Federal Victims Strategy

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The objective of the Federal Victims Strategy (FVS) is to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice and federal corrections systems. The FVS is a horizontal initiative led by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues at the Department of Justice and includes the Correctional Service of Canada, the Parole Board of Canada, the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions and the Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime.

The FVS also includes the Victims Fund, which provides grants and contributions funding to victims of crime, provinces, territories and non-governmental organizations to develop or enhance victim services and victim-related issues.

Special Advocates Funding Program

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The Special Advocates Funding Program was established to support the Minister of Justice in implementing the 2008 amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). These amendments created a special advocates regime which ensures a Charter compliant procedure for removing inadmissible non-Canadians from Canada while using and protecting national security information. Briefly stated, special advocates are appointed by a court or tribunal to protect the interests of named persons during in camera IRPA Division 9 proceedings. Division 9 proceedings consider national security information to determine admissibility in the absence of the named person and his or her counsel in proceedings such as the determination of the reasonableness of a security certificate.

The Special Advocates Funding Program ensures that the Minister of Justice meets the following requirements of the amended IRPA: establishing a list of persons who may be appointed as special advocates; publishing the list in a manner that facilitates public access to it; and ensuring that special advocates are provided with adequate administrative support and resources.

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Youth Justice Services Funding Program

$141,692,415

The Youth Justice Services Funding Program (YJSFP) is a cost-shared contribution program which supports all provinces and territories in their delivery of youth justice programs and services. The objective of the YJSFP is to support those services and programs which: encourage proportionate and timely accountability for unlawful behavior; encourage effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into the community; and assist in reserving the formal court process and custody for the most serious offenders.

Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program

$11,048,000

The Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) Program is a contribution program which supports all provinces and territories in the delivery of specialized therapeutic programs and services for youth with mental health needs who are convicted of a serious violent offence under the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA).

More particularly, the IRCS Program ensures that provinces and territories have the capacity to both assess and treat young persons as required by the intensive rehabilitative custody and supervision sentencing provisions of the YCJA. In addition, the IRCS Program provides funding for other cases of serious violence committed by young persons who are suffering from a psychological disturbance or mental/mood disorder but who were not sentenced under the aforementioned YCJA provisions.

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Youth Justice Fund

$4,505,000

The Youth Justice Fund (YJF) provides grants and contributions funding to projects that encourage a more effective youth justice system, respond to emerging youth justice issues and, enable greater citizen and community participation in the youth justice system. Funding priorities include projects targeted at (1) youth with mental health issues and/or cognitive impairments such as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, (2) drug treatment programming for youth, and (3) youth involved in or vulnerable to gun, gang and drug activities. Eligible recipients include provinces, territories and non-governmental organizations.

Integrated Market Enforcement Teams Reserve Fund

$550,000

The Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMET) Reserve Fund funds extraordinary prosecution expenses incurred in IMET-generated cases being prosecuted by provincial attorneys general. IMETs are special RCMP-led units that investigate capital markets fraud.

The Reserve Fund will provide funding for expenses incurred as a result of (1) exceptional court ordered disclosure, (2) specialized contracts, for example, forensic experts, language/interpretation, and (3) technical and/or equipment requirements including scanning equipment, computers and audio/video technology.

Contraventions Act Fund

$9,094,900

The Contraventions Act Fund provides funding to provinces, territories and municipalities who, on behalf of the federal government, prosecute minor federal offences (“contraventions”) through provincial ticketing regimes. The Fund provides the necessary funding for such measures as the hiring of bilingual staff, language training, bilingual signage and documentation. These measures are necessary to ensure that offenders’ language rights under the Official Languages Act and the Criminal Code are respected.

The objective of the Contraventions Act is to simplify the procedure for the prosecution of federal regulatory offences which are minor in nature. This is accomplished by designating these offences as “contraventions” and allowing for their prosecution through a ticketing regime (including provincial regimes). This approach ensures a more effective application of federal statutes and reduces the workload of the courts by allowing for the voluntary payment of fines in lieu of prosecuting them through the Criminal Code summary conviction process.

Supporting Families Fund

$16,000,000

The objectives of the Supporting Families Fund are to facilitate access to the family justice system for families experiencing separation and divorce through various services, programs, and information resources, particularly those that promote compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. The Fund is also intended to address the needs of parents and communities that face barriers in accessing the family justice system. The provincial and territorial governments are primarily responsible for providing family justice services in Canada. The Fund assists the provinces and territories to implement family law reforms and develop and maintain family justice services such as mediation, parent education sessions and support recalculation services that help parents comply with their family obligations. The Fund also assists non-governmental organizations in developing public legal education and information and training resources that aim to promote compliance with financial support and custody and access obligations. The Fund will sunset on March 31, 2017.

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund

$6,492,845

The Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund supports the Department’s commitments under the Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages 2013–2018: Education, Immigration, Communities by increasing the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer justice services in both official languages. The Fund is based on two pillars: the “Information” pillar and the “Training” pillar.

The Information pillar aims to offer legal information services that will help minority Francophone and Anglophone Canadians learn about their rights, obligations and responsibilities in the official language of their choice. The Training pillar aims to enhance the justice system capacity to better serve Canadians in both official languages by providing funding for the training and development of bilingual justice professionals. It will support the development of in-class, long distance and at-work training programs. Funding recipients will develop web- based and other technology based training tools.

Hague Conference on Private International Law

$250,000

The purpose of the Hague Conference is to work for the progressive unification of the rules of private international law. The Department pays an annual assessed contribution to enable Canada to meet its financial obligations to the Conference as well as to help fulfil Canada’s international policy objectives by participating in the work of the organization. The unification of private international law has great importance both in a national and international context, particularly because it facilitates the resolution of disputes involving two or more jurisdictions that may have conflicting legal rules relating to various private law matters. The development of uniform legislation reduces the risks of such conflicts.

International Institute for the Unification of Private Law (Unidroit)

$80,000

The purposes of Unidroit are to examine ways of harmonizing and coordinating the private law of States and groups of States, and to prepare gradually for the adoption by the various States of uniform rules of private law. The Department pays an annual assessed contribution to enable Canada to meet its financial obligations to Unidroit as well as to help fulfil Canada’s international policy objectives by participating in the work of the organization.

Services to the Department

Change Management Office

France Pégeot ADM*

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Biography

The Change Management Office (CMO) leads the development and implementation of the Department of Justice’s integrated change management agenda, known as “Canada’s Legal Team, Ready for 2020”. It includes the Legal Services Review (LSR), Destination 2020, and the Innovation Council.

The CMO coordinates and supports the work of the Deputy Minister-level Strategic Legal Issues Management Committee which provides oversight and high-level guidance for the development and implementation of the LSR measures. It is also responsible for the implementation of Business Analytics in Justice that will serve as a process for continual improvement, performance measurement and enhanced business decision-making through reports and analysis on legal services usage and results.

Communications Branch

Tracie Noftle

Director General

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Biography

The Communications Branch supports the Minister, Deputy Minister and senior managers to ensure that communications with the public are well-coordinated, effectively managed and responsive to the needs of the audience. It provides a full range of media relations services, strategic communications advice, and products such as: news releases, backgrounders, speeches, photograph and video production, and development of web content.

*Assistant Deputy Minister

Internal Audit

Inanc Yazar

Chief Audit Executive

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Biography

The Internal Audit Branch of the Department of Justice contributes to the strengthening of accountability and the improvement of overall effectiveness and efficiency of departmental operations by determining whether the Department’s network of risk management, internal control and governance processes, as designed and represented by management, are adequate and functioning appropriately. This includes ensuring that:

Management and CFO Sector

Marie-Josée Thivierge

ADM and CFO

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Biography

The Management and CFO Sector provides a suite of internal services to assist the Department in meeting its policy and program priorities, building a workplace of choice, as well as delivering high quality legal services to the Government of Canada. To achieve this, the Sector supports the Deputy Minister in his role as Chief Accounting Officer by providing objective advice on the overall stewardship of the Department’s financial management and its performance; provides human resources management including learning and leadership development, official languages, recruitment, compensation and labour relations, classification, and talent and performance management; supports the practice of law through a variety of standardized tools, systems, policies and protocols including timekeeping and legal risk management; develops and provides guidance on corporate documents such as Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board submissions, Reports on Plans and Priorities, Departmental Performance Reports, etc.; implements the Department’s Safety and Security Program and IT Security Services; provides information management services; and processes public access requests to the Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office. The Sector also provides select service to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada under a shared services agreement.

Policy Sector*

Donald K. Piragoff, Q.C.

Senior ADM

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Biography

The Policy Sector supports the Minister’s legislative and policy initiatives and priorities by providing comprehensive and strategic legal and policy advice, law reform, research, program delivery and international assistance in support of Canada’s justice system.  The Policy Sector is comprised of the following Sections: Criminal Law Policy Section; Family Children and Youth Section; Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section; Programs Branch; Policy Integration and Coordination Section; and, International Legal Programs Section.

*Except for public law policy, which is covered in the next section, Services to Government.

Services to the Government

Aboriginal Affairs Portfolio

Pamela McCurry

ADAG*

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Biography

The Aboriginal Affairs Portfolio (AAP) has functional responsibility for Aboriginal matters in the Department of Justice in order to ensure consistency of legal positions and practices throughout all federal government departments. AAP provides expert advice and services relating to Aboriginal law and strategic policy, Aboriginal consultation, resolution of litigation and related disputes with Aboriginal people, and a complete range of advisory services for Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

*Assistant Deputy Attorney General

Business and Regulatory Law Portfolio

Lynn Lovett

Acting ADM

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Biography

The Business and Regulatory Law Portfolio (BRLP) provides integrated legal advisory, litigation and drafting services to support 60 client departments, agencies and other federal entities on a wide range of issues, including: environmental protection, transportation regulatory matters, fisheries management, health, agricultural and food protection, intellectual property, bankruptcy, communications, real property, energy projects, cultural protection, international development, social services, competition law, commercial transactions and procurement. These services are provided through 14 Departmental Legal Services Units (DLSUs) as well as six regional offices.

The ADM is also responsible for the Commercial Law Section, which includes the Property Law Secretariat and the Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law Secretariat. As such, the ADM has functional responsibility for the practice of commercial law across the Department of Justice in order to provide strategic direction and ensure consistency of legal positions and practices throughout all federal government departments.

Central Agencies Portfolio

Sandra Hassan ADM

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Biography

The Central Agencies Portfolio (CAP) manages legal, policy and operational issues related to the central agency functions of government. The Portfolio, which comprises seven DLSUs, provides services related to financial institutions, public service employment and labour law, tax law, Crown law, financial law, money laundering, terrorist financing, machinery of government, and the federal budget.

The ADM is the Counsel to the Department of Finance and member of the executive committees of both the Department of Justice and Finance. She manages advisory and litigation services for the Department of Finance (which includes General Legal Services and Tax Counsel Division) as well as the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Public Service Commission, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions of Canada, the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada, and the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada.

Legislative Services Branch

Philippe Hallée

Chief Legislative Counsel

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Biography

The Legislative Service Branch (LSB) supports the Government through a range of services to government departments and agencies, including: drafting of bilingual and bijurial government bills and motions to amend; drafting of regulations or their examination under the Statutory Instruments Act; examination of bills and regulations and Charter certification; harmonization of federal legislation with the civil law of Quebec; updating, consolidation and publication of federal statutes and regulations and related tables; and advisory and revision services relating to legislative policy matters.

Litigation Branch

Geoffrey Bickert

ADAG

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Biography

The Litigation Branch supports the Government, mitigates risks and manages the law before, during or as a result of litigation. The Attorney General of Canada (AGC) has responsibility for all litigation for or against the Crown, any department, or Crown agent corporations. The litigation function within the Department of Justice is handled by the Litigation Branch at headquarters, the regional offices, and some specialized DLSUs. The ADAG Litigation has functional and coordination responsibility for all litigation conducted by or on behalf of the Department of Justice.

The Branch is also responsible for extradition, mutual legal assistance requests and related litigation; national security litigation and coordination; class action and mass litigation to which Canada is a party; the Agent Affairs Program; and litigation support services and technology.

The ADAG is the Government’s chief legal adviser in matters relating to litigation by and against the Crown and provides substantive and strategic advice to the Minister, the Deputy Minister Team and the Privy Council Office.

Public Law Sector

Laurie Wright

ADM

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Biography

The Public Law Sector (PLS) has six specialized legal advisory and policy sections in the areas of human rights law and policy; constitutional, administrative and international law (which includes public international law and international private law); information and privacy law and policy; official languages law and policy; judicial affairs; and international trade law. Expert advice is provided to clients within the Department of Justice and across the federal government while policy work supports the Minister of Justice.

Public Safety, Defence and Immigration Portfolio

Elisabeth Eid

ADAG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Public Safety, Defence and Immigration Portfolio (PSDI) provides a full range of strategic legal services (legislative, advisory and litigation) related to matters and litigation on national security and defence to the following departments and agencies: Public Safety Canada and its component agencies (Correctional Service of Canada, Parole Board of Canada, RCMP, CSIS and the Canada Border Services Agency), Citizenship and Immigration Canada, the Department of National Defence, and the Communications Security Establishment Canada. It is also responsible for the Department of Justice’s Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Program.

Tax Law Services Portfolio

Micheline Van-Erum

ADAG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Tax Law Services Portfolio (TLS), which has offices in every region of Canada, provides legal support, including legal advice, litigation and drafting services, on matters such as the goods and services tax, income tax, collections, employment insurance, administrative law, corporate governance and civil litigation. The Portfolio’s in-depth expertise in law and related areas allows it to mobilize resources best suited to respond to the evolving legal needs of the Canada Revenue Agency.

Regional Offices

The regional offices provide litigation and advisory services to federal departments and agencies operating across the country.

Atlantic Region

Thomas Beveridge

RDG*

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Atlantic Regional Office (ARO) main office is located in Halifax and operates within the four Atlantic provinces. Additional offices are located in Charlottetown, St. John’s. The ARO provides litigation and advisory services within the region, while the Veterans Affairs Legal Services Unit provides advisory services nationally to its client.

*Regional Director General

Quebec Region

Francisco Couto

RDG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Quebec Regional Office (QRO) is headquartered in Montreal with a sub-office in Ottawa. Quebec is the only province in which Canada’s two legal traditions exist side by side. Questions of private law are dealt with under the Civil Code of Québec, while common law applies in matters of public and criminal law. QRO provides legal services to federal departments and organizations operating in Quebec. It represents the Attorney General of Canada in proceedings heard by Quebec tribunals and courts, as well as before the Supreme Court of Canada in matters such as immigration, taxation, commercial law, regulatory law, and Aboriginal law. Its notaries provide legal services related to commercial and real property matters involving the Government of Canada.

Ontario Region

Carla Lyon

RDG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Ontario Regional Office (ORO) is headquartered in Toronto and provides legal services to dozens of governmental clients in Ontario. It provides primarily litigation services in areas that include Aboriginal law, business law, immigration law, public law, regulatory law, tax law and extradition. The ORO also provides some advisory services related to property, commercial and environmental matters.

Prairie Region

Barbara Ritzen, Q.C.

RDG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Prairie Regional Office (PRO) main office is located in Edmonton. The PRO operates in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and its additional offices are located in Calgary, Saskatoon and Winnipeg. PRO provides legal services for federal departments and agencies. Services offered to client departments and agencies include Aboriginal law, civil litigation, tax litigation and collections and advisory services in business, regulatory and immigration law.

British Columbia Region

J.S. (Bill) Basran

RDG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The British Columbia Regional Office (BCRO) is located in Vancouver. The BCRO delivers litigation and advisory services to more than 30 federal departments and agencies in British Columbia, as well as in other provinces and territories where B.C. counsel are the lead. The areas of law are broad and include Aboriginal, tax, immigration, public safety, defence, central agency, business and regulatory, among others. Regional counsel represent the Government of Canada at various tribunals and all levels of court.

Northern Region

Lynn Hjartarson

RDG

     [Information was severed in accordance with the Access to Information Act. s.19(1)]     

Biography

The Northern Regional Office (NRO) main office is located in Yellowknife (Northwest Territories). NRO also operates in Whitehorse (Yukon), and in addition, one lawyer is co-located with a client department in Iqaluit (Nunavut). NRO delivers legal services to client departments legal services cover a number of areas, including Aboriginal law, civil litigation, business and regulatory law, and tax collections.

Regions

Organizational Chart

Organizational Chart